God's Law
God's Law

Share this on FacebookGoogle+RedditEmailPrinter version

Heart, Merry


Show more Show less
Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Sep 30, 2018
The W's and H's of Meditation (Conclusion)

David Maas, concluding the series on the W's and H's of meditation, focuses on a series of scriptures warning us to guard our hearts, bring every thought into captivity, and let no one take our crowns, emphasizing our responsibility to take charge of our thoughts, monitoring not only what goes into our minds, but proactively filtering the contaminated, toxic sewage that too frequently percolates out of our carnal nature. The only thing that we will take through the grave is our character—the contents of our cumulative thoughts over a lifetime. Because we will ultimately turn into what we assimilate, we must take back the high-jacked tool of meditation to drive out carnal thoughts, replacing them with godly character. Researchers have scientifically proven that meditation improves memory, as well as generates profound peace as an antidote to agitation, stress, confusion. When properly practiced, meditation can help us to plant the mind of Christ into our nervous system, using the spirit in man—the candle of the Lord—to write upon our hearts His precious law using the gift of the Holy Spirit. During our pilgrimage in this life, we must carry our spiritual heritage box around in fractured clay jars, but at our resurrection, we will be glorified in spiritual bodies more luminous than the sun as we will see God as He is and assume our new roles in His royal family.

Show more Show less
CGG Weekly; Dec 1, 2017
Be Happy (Part Two)

Gary Montgomery:  We serve a God who is positive, working toward a glorious future for Himself and the multitudes of sons and daughters He is preparing for that wonderful world tomorrow. ...

Show more Show less
Sermon; Jul 8, 2017
The W's and H's of Meditation (Part One)

David Maas, citing scriptures indicating that we become what we think about all day long, and that ruminating on carnal thoughts brings death, revisits the topic of meditation, a powerful antidote in combatting negative thinking, a behavior which we are all prone to. When we look at the Hebrew etymology of the Hebrew word, Hagah (which means to moan, growl, utter, or speak softly),one outstanding mnemonic comes into play, namely the letter Gimel, signifying a camel. Famously, camels are ruminants, which means they "chew the cud," an action which resembles pondering over a deep thought. God defines those ruminants which chew their cud and have split hoofs as "clean." Their four-compartment stomachs enable them to purge out all the impurities from their food. Their ruminating action provides a powerful analogy for meditating or digesting thoughts. The word ruminate suggests a metaphor illustrating how one can thoroughly purify the thoughts in our nervous system, enabling us to ingest, assimilate and digest the bread of life, and the manna from heaven, namely the word of God, which His called-out ones have been given a lifetime to digest.

Show more Show less
Ready Answer; March 1999
A Time to Laugh

At the right time and in the right situation, laughter can indeed be the best medicine. David Maas explains how theraputic humor and merriment can be both physically and spiritually.



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

Looking for More?

Receive Biblical truth in your inbox—spam-free! This daily newsletter provides a starting point for personal study, and gives valuable insight into the verses that make up the Word of God. See what over 145,000 subscribers are already receiving.


 





 

Privacy Policy
Close
E-mail This Page