Share this on FacebookGoogle+RedditEmailPrinter version

Gift, Given to God


Show more Show less
Sermonette; Apr 10, 2015
Holy for the Lord

Martin Collins, reflecting on the foulest smelling item on the earth, namely the Titan Arum flower, emitting the odor of rotting flesh, contrasts it with the wonderful aromas recorded in scripture, sweet aromas from burnt offerings, fragrant incense, symbolic of prayers. If the Israelites were to use this incense for profane or personal purposes, they would be cut off from their people. A righteous man compromises with God's Law, resembles dead flies in perfume. Incense symbolizes the prayers of the saints; sweet aromas are as horrible as the odor of Titan Arum if offered by people in defiance. Our offerings, as our prayers, should remain holy for the Lord, exuding a fragrant aroma.

Show more Show less
Sermonette; Oct 4, 2014
Offering From the Heart

Ronny Graham, reflecting on the history and circumstances of offerings in the Bible, including the Queen of Sheba's fabulous gift to Solomon, Cain and Abel's respective offerings, and Abraham's offering to Melchizedek, focuses on the most significant offering ever given to a dignitary—gold, frankincense, and myrrh—given to Jesus by the magi. Gold, because of its beautiful luster and its rarity, is difficult to attain, and its permanence symbolizes royalty. Frankincense, a fragrance used in incense, symbolic of prayers, was not allowed to be used for private use, but only for God's use. Myrrh is fragrant oil used for anointing prior to death. All three of these gifts brought by the magi were prophetic symbols of Christ. Any offering, to be pleasing to God, should be from the heart and must involve sacrifice. Consequently, the amount is irrelevant, as the widow's mite proved. But God wants our offerings to be genuine, sacrificial, and from the heart, as His gifts are toward us.

Show more Show less
Sermonette; Apr 15, 2014
Offerings and Sacrificing

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting that we have been marking nearly 6,000 years since Abel's offering was accepted and Cain's offering was rejected by God, an event revealing the carnal proclivity for jealousy leading to the first murder, reminds us that the Bible clearly shows that the requirement for the offering was in-force at the time of Adam and Eve. Cain's penalty was banishment from his family. An offering is a gift given to God. Seven times a year, we are required to appear before the Lord with a gift, and not empty-handed. The gift is protocol, opening the door to the King's presence, establishing a relationship. Offerings —gifts—are transactions that bring people together. We are giving back to God only what God has already given to us. The offerings unify the whole group. A quality, acceptable offering involves faith, proper valuation, and righteousness, being cheerfully given with a measure of sacrifice.

Show more Show less
CGG Weekly; Apr 22, 2011
An Acceptable Gift

Through His sinless life and vicarious death, Jesus Christ perfectly fulfilled all of the instructions in the Old Covenant regarding sacrifices and offerings. ...

Show more Show less
'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; March 2003
The Offerings of Leviticus (Part Two): The Burnt Offering

The first of the offerings of Leviticus is the burnt offering, a sacrifice that is completely consumed on the altar. John Ritenbaugh shows how this type teaches us about Christ's total dedication to God—and how we should emulate it.



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

Looking for More?

Receive Biblical truth in your inbox—spam-free! This daily newsletter provides a starting point for personal study, and gives valuable insight into the verses that make up the Word of God. See what over 145,000 subscribers are already receiving.


 





 

Privacy Policy
Close
E-mail This Page