Ten Commandments
Ten Commandments

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Increased with Goods

Go to Bible verses for: Increased with Goods

The Relationship Deficit (Part Three)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

In examining the letter to Laodicea, we can easily see to what extent a relationship deficit stands at its core. Beginning with the name, Laodicea means "the people judge." ...

'He Who Has an Ear, Let Him Hear . . .'

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

Herbert W. Armstrong began The World Tomorrow radio telecast on October 9, 1933. It was broadcast, uninterrupted, until October 9, 1971, when it was taken off the air for several months due to internal turmoil within the Worldwide Church of God. The World . . .

The Relationship Deficit (Part Two)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

The letter to Laodicea (Revelation 3:14-21), the Parable of the Faithful and Evil Servants (Luke 12:35-40), and the fifth chapter of the Song of Songs all picture Jesus Christ standing behind a door, waiting for His people to respond. ...

Guarding Against a Laodicean Attitude

Sermonette by Kim Myers

Kim Myers, seeing a parallel between the church's drift into Laodiceanism and the physical nation of Israel drifting into a similar tolerant attitude toward immorality and lawlessness, as seen by the continuous trashing of the Constitution and the Federal . . .

Why Is Life So Hard? (Part Two)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

In Part One, we saw that pressure, hardship, and anguish are not elements of a Christian's life that suddenly disappear because of faith and God's calling. It also became clear that trial ...

Laodiceanism and Being There Next Year

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Our biggest danger at this time is to be lured into spiritual drunkenness by the pagan Babylonian system. Our God is not what we say we worship but whom we serve.

Poor in Spirit

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh suggests that being poor in spirit (a precursor to humility) is a necessary, foundational spiritual state one must have to qualify for God's Kingdom. As the polar opposite of pride, poor in spirit describes a condition of being acutely awar. . .

Be There Next Year

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Members of God's church usually come home from the Feast of Tabernacles with renewed spiritual vigor. Yet, we are painfully aware that some fall away each year. John Ritenbaugh shows that we must actively seek God and His righteousness to ensure that we wi. . .

Psalm 23 (Part 1)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Of all animals, sheep need the most care and are extremely vulnerable to predators, pests, and fear, leading to extremely dependent and trusting behavior.

What Does God Really Want? (Part 3)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, using the term "malignant narcissism" (from M. Scott Peck's book "People Of The Lie") to describe the blind Laodicean pride which denies our inherent sinfulness and imperfection by means of clever self-decptive quibblin. . .

I Know Your Works

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Contrary to Protestant understanding, our works emphatically do count - showing or demonstrating (not just telling) that we will be obedient.


Looking for scriptures? Go to Bible verses for: Increased with Goods



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

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