Ten Commandments
Ten Commandments

Share this on FacebookGoogle+RedditEmailPrinter version

Egypt, Destroyed


Related Topics
Show more Show less
CGG Weekly; Sep 4, 2015
Are the Blood Moons Significant? (Part Two)

David C. Grabbe:  Last time, we saw that the verses typically referenced regarding the four lunar eclipses—"blood moons"—are actually describing the Sixth Seal of the book of Revelation (Revelation 6:12-14). ...

Show more Show less
Sermon; Apr 10, 2015
Psalms: Book One (Part Two)

Richard Ritenbaugh, continuing his exposition of Book One of the Psalms, focusing on themes pertinent to the spring holy days, demonstrates that God orchestrated all of the events of the Exodus, making Pharaoh's pitiful plans irrelevant. God led Israel to the spot they felt they were trapped in order to demonstrate His absolute sovereignty, His ability to save, and His ability to totally annihilate all opposition. The Song of Moses, recorded in Exodus 15, indicates that ancient Israel finally got the point—at least momentarily. Psalm 1 and Psalm 2 amplify the themes of the Song of Moses, with the first Psalm concentrating on the Torah, or instruction itself, but the second focusing on the Son; we must come to know both His instruction and Him personally. The Son will have the final say; only a fool would attempt to test His sovereignty. The first stanza of Psalm 1 expresses astonishment that anyone would try to plot against God. Because God controls the whole universe, He laughs in mockery and derision at anyone who would even contemplate rebellion. Because Jesus Christ is God's begotten Son, we can avoid the rod of His anger by paying respect with worshipful fear and awe.

Show more Show less
CGG Weekly; Nov 22, 2001
Moses, Psalmist (Part 3)

Richard T. Ritenbaugh:  We frequently perceive characters in books as one-dimensional, and if we are an imaginative and comprehensive reader, perhaps in two dimensions. ...

Show more Show less
Sermon/Bible Study; Apr 1, 1989
Lamentations (Part 1; 1989)

John Ritenbaugh gives us empathy for the apostle Paul, graphically portraying his physical hardships involving more than 6,500 miles of perilous foot- and sea-travel. Through the eyes of various secular, contemporary histories, we vicariously experience his difficulties working his trade, problems with lawless communities, frequent inclement weather, unsanitary inn accommodations, dangers from wild animals, hazardous ship travel, overbearing treatment from Roman soldiers, etc. The study then shifts to an introduction to the book of Lamentations, focusing on grim hardships (similar to Paul's perils) Christians may face in the future.

Show more Show less
Herbert W. Armstrong booklet; 1958
The Proof of the Bible

The BIBLE—Superstition or AUTHORITY? Did you ever stop to PROVE whether the Bible is the divinely inspired Word of God?



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

Looking for More?

Receive Biblical truth in your inbox—spam-free! This daily newsletter provides a starting point for personal study, and gives valuable insight into the verses that make up the Word of God. See what over 145,000 subscribers are already receiving.


 





 

Privacy Policy
Close
E-mail This Page