Sabbath
Sabbath

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Twain, Mark


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Commentary; Nov 7, 2015
Mightier Than the Sword (Part Twenty-One)

John Ritenbaugh, observing that the philosophers who have made a lasting negative impact on western culture (Darwin, Marx, Emerson) were born within one decade after the 19th Century began, warns that Satan has been exponentially stepping up his diabolical attack on all of mankind, using the poisonous pens of these philosophers to caustically erode religion, economics, science, and theology. All of these philosophers had been born into religious families; some of which had fathers which were pastors. Another radical philosopher who fits into this mold was Friedrich Nietzsche, who was the both the son of and nephew of Lutheran pastors, but was influenced by Feuerbach's The Essence of Christianity, to totally cut his ties with any form of religion. Nietzsche's ideas were extremely toxic, having powerful influence inside Germany, branding him, in some circles, as the most dangerous philosopher of the Millennium, having unmitigated arrogance and a demonic hatred toward Christ. In 1888, Nietzsche identified himself as the anti-Christ, about a month before he became clinically insane, never to recover his lucidity. Despite his abject insanity, his ideas became instrumental in modern psychology, especially the emerging tributary of existentialism, a philosophical stance regarding experience as unexplainable, ruling out the possibility of any Creator God who is working out any purpose on earth. Nietzsche's "will to power" translates into the authoritarian "might makes right" stance practiced by many individuals, including Hitler, Lenin, Stalin, and Mao Tse Tung, as well as many of those wielding and seeking power today. Nietzsche desired that the strong would overpower and liquidate the weak, claiming that the noblest class were the barbarians—a survival -of -the-fittest scheme that fit into and shaped Darwin's teachings. Nietzsche's ideas also shaped the human potential movement as well as the literary works of George Bernard Shaw, Eugene O'Neill, Ernest Hemmingway, Mark Twain, and F. Scott Fit

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; May 2015
Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Thirteen): Confessions

As he closes the seventh chapter of Ecclesiastes, Solomon makes a confession about the search for wisdom, saying that, even to him, true wisdom remained beyond his grasp. Acknowledging this truth, John Ritenbaugh explains that, while wisdom will ultimately elude us too, we must continue to seek it because pursuing it is itself a great reward.

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CGG Weekly; Jul 7, 2006
Evaluating Culture

Richard T. Ritenbaugh:  In listening to a series of 48 lectures by University of California at Berkeley Professor Robert Greenberg titled "How to Listen to and Understand Great Music," I have come to a greater realization of the evolving tastes among consumers of Western music. ...

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Sermon; Mar 20, 1993
Love's Emotional Dimension

John Ritenbaugh focuses upon the emotional dimension of love, reiterating that love doesn't become 'love' until the thought, or the feeling, motivates the person to act. Love is an act. If we don't do what is right, the right feeling will never be formed, because emotions are largely developed by our experiences. The right emotions require God's Holy Spirit. Like a marriage relationship, our relationship with God grows more and more intimate as we give it time and attention, conforming to the other person's preferences in the relationship. We are never going to know God unless we do the same kinds of things with Him, keeping His Commandments, devoting time to prayer, Bible study, and meditation. If we are working on our relationship with God (giving it our time and attention), then God's love for us will be reciprocated back to Him in the form of obedience, totally trusting in Him to shape our lives for His purpose.



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

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