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Ready Answer; May 2015
Wool and Linen

Not a few people, and even many Christians, think that the Bible contains some strange laws. For instance, Deuteronomy 22:11 forbids the wearing of a garment that contains different fabrics. Mike Ford tackles this particular command, contending that it contains a spiritual principle with a profound impact on Christian life.

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Sermonette; Jan 24, 2015
Can You Mix Wool and Linen?

Mike Ford explores the possible physical and spiritual significance of the prohibition to mix wool and linen which appears in Deuteronomy 22:11 and Leviticus 19:19. One explanation seems to come from the consumer protection corner, asserting that mixing fibers produces an inferior garment. Some commentaries refer to the respective offerings of Cain and Abel, suggesting that linen may represent worldliness or unrighteousness (even though the book of Revelation tells us the saints will be clothed in linen), while wool symbolizes righteousness. Some Protestant commentaries jump to the conclusion that linen refers to works while wool refers to grace, indicating that they should never be joined. Some commentaries suggest that linen signifies Egypt (even though the Aaronic priests were commanded to wear linen undergarments) and that Israelites were forbidden to mix with Egypt. Realizing that since neither one jot nor tittle will pass from the Law until heaven and earth pass away, we are obligated to look for the commonsense spiritual applications. Since this law appears with other prohibitions of mixing seed, mixing livestock, and keeping things separate, we conclude that God wants us to remain separate from the world, not being unequally yoked with any aspect of this world.

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Sermon; Jul 1, 1995
The Covenants, Grace and Law (Part 16)

John Ritenbaugh teaches that God's grace gives us focus on what the Law's true purpose is — namely the basic guide as to what good works are — rules for the journey of life. God's Law outlines a way of life, defining sin, actually categorizing a descending level of gravity or seriousness (from sins which lead to death and those which do not; I John 5:16). Righteousness consists of applying the Law's letter and/or intent. Sin constitutes a failure of applying or living up to the standards of what God defines as proper or right. The conclusion of this sermon begins an exposition of four principles determining whether the law is binding.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Jul 8, 1989
The Commandments (Part 11)

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that since a nation is, for the most part, a family grown large, respect for the fifth commandment constitutes the basis for all good government. The family provides the venue for someone to learn to be hospitable and to make sacrifices for one another, learning the rudiments of community relations. For the child, parents stand in the place of God in the family structure, as the child's creator, provider, and teacher. Successful parenting involves sacrifice and intense work. The quality of a child's relationship with his parent (as well as the quality of parenting) determines his relationship to the community as well as to God. Compliance to the fifth commandment brings about the built-in, promised blessing of a long quality life. Our obligation to honor and to take responsibility for the care for our parents (as well as those more elderly than we are) never ends.



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

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