Themes of I Corinthians (Part 8)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

In I Corinthians 15, Paul expounds the resurrection, recalling the basic facts of the gospel message, stressing that salvation is an ongoing process.


Acts (Part Eighteen)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh


Are You Looking for Some New Thing? (Part 2)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

The events in Acts 17 contrast the hope, certainty and assurance expressed by Paul with the diffidence and uncertainty of the Athenian philosophers.


Are You Looking for Some New Thing? (Part 1)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, focusing upon the obsessive quirk of human nature to hear "some new thing," describes Paul's encounter with the Athenian philosophers at the Areopogas, the virtual headquarters of Western culture. Throughout history, the Word of God has always been in perpetual conflict with the world's culture, a …


Themes of I Corinthians (Part 1)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Corinth was at the crossroads of trade routes, abounding in religious syncretism. Paul's letter to the Corinthians instructs us how to live in a wicked society.


Is America a Christian Nation? (Part Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on Ephesians 1:13-23, reminds us that as God's Called- out ones, we are recipients of the promised seed made to Adam and Eve, the Holy Line, beginning with Seth leading through Noah, Abraham, Jacob, David, and Jesus Christ, the promises given to Abraham which include being a blessing to all nations. The …


Foundations

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

John Reid reflects on a prior cruise to the Mediterranean in which he visited the Acropolis, the Parthenon, the Areopagus, Athens, and other locales in which the apostle Paul had walked. The pillars of the Parthenon were fitted together in sections. We, as God's called out ones, are figuratively represented by these pillars. It …


Are You Sure You Believe in God? (Part One)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

An atheist rationalizes his belief in no God by stating that suffering could no longer be blamed on an omniscient deity, allowing him to live without guilt.