Are You Bearing Your Cross?

'Ready Answer' by Staff

How do we, as modern Christians, bear our cross as Jesus commands? Christ meant far more than simply carrying a stake over our shoulders!


What Does it Mean to Take Up the Cross?

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

Bearing our cross means our time on this earth is virtually finished, that we are willing to give up our lives, emulating the life of our Savior.


What Does It Mean to Take Up the Cross?

'Ready Answer' by David C. Grabbe

Jesus commands His followers to take our cross and follow Him. Does He mean to carry a pagan symbol, or is there a deeper meaning to His weighty words?


The Cross: Christian Banner or Pagan Relic?

Article by Earl L. Henn (1934-1997)

Is it alright to wear a crucifix? As it turns out, the cross was a pagan worship symbol long before Christ's death, and was never used by the first century church.


Overcoming (Part 5): Self-Denial

Bible Study by Martin G. Collins

A key to overcoming our sins is learning when to deny ourselves. Christ plainly declares that those who desire to follow Him must deny themselves.


Conditions of Discipleship (Part One)

CGG Weekly by Mike Fuhrer

When Jesus gathered His disciples as He began His ministry, He needed principled and devout worshippers to teach and prepare for the work of spreading the gospel.


Principled Living (Part One): Imitating Christ

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, beginning a series on "Principled Living," focuses on the aspect of drafting (a racing term describing a lead vehicle "punching a hole in the air," enabling trailing vehicles to increase speed, pulling ahead of the pack), paralleling the spiritual metaphor of Jesus Christ blazing a trail, …


Remembering Your Vows

Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

Like the marriage covenant, counting the cost is the most serious part of the baptismal agreement, not something to be taken lightly.


God Works in Mysterious Ways (Part Five)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

For His Own reasons, God has chosen not to reveal His plan to those the world considers wise, but, instead, to work with the weaker sort of mankind.


Does Doctrine Really Matter? (Part Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Even with Christ's sacrifice, God does not owe us salvation. We are called to walk, actively putting to death our carnal natures, resisting the complacency.


The Summertime Soldier and Sunshine Patriotism

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We must put our lives, treasure, and honor on the line, picking up our cross daily, declaring our independence from carnality, evil and bondage to sin.


Matthew (Part Sixteen)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that disciples of Christ should expect persecution, often from people we normally would feel comfort and protection from, such as members from our own family. The two-edged sword (the Word of God) divides families because receptivity of this word is not a given- especially if one has not yet been …


Christianity Is a Fight! (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Our pilgrimage to the Kingdom will not be easy; we will suffer fatigue from difficult battles with serious consequences. We fight the world, Satan, and our flesh.


Sin (Part Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

True Christianity is no cakewalk into eternal life, but a life and death struggle against our flesh, the world, and a most formidable spirit adversary.


Knowing God: Formality and Customs (Part Six)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh warns that human nature is hostile to change, even when it is confirmed to be in the wrong. In the matter of godly standards for dress (as in any other aspect of God's teaching), we must adopt the humble, childlike, sincere, unassuming, unpretentious, and teachable attitude, loving God intimately, denying …


Lamentations (Part One; 1989)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh gives us empathy for the apostle Paul, graphically portraying his physical hardships involving more than 6,500 miles of perilous foot- and sea-travel. Through the eyes of various secular, contemporary histories, we vicariously experience his difficulties working his trade, problems with lawless communities, …