Childrearing (Part 1)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

The family problems predicted for the end times in II Timothy stem from faulty childrearing practices. We must help prepare our children for the Kingdom.


Why Does God Keep Secrets?

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by David F. Maas

By not revealing everything immediately, God has been employing teaching techniques that have taken the educational community thousands of years to discover.


Hope to the End (Part Two)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reiterating that there is a malaise of hopelessness, anxiety, and dread permeating this nation like never before, systematically explains: (1) how we arrived at this crisis, (2) why God has ordained that we live in these conditions, (3) how bad choices by the trillions eroded the moral foundation of our culture, …


Childrearing (Part 4)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Children do not initiate love but reflect it. If a child does not receive a convincing demonstration of this love, he will not become a conductor of love.


Sanctification, Teens, and Self-Control

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Young people are responsible for the spiritual knowledge that they have learned from their parents, as well as the custodianship of spiritual blessings.


Childrearing (Part 5)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

We must not leave child rearing to chance, but ought to bend the tender twigs entrusted to us toward God's purpose, training our children in righteousness.


Don't Stop, Keep Moving

Sermon by Mike Ford

The priest Eli is a tragic example of someone who began his tenure with energy, but coasted into complacency, eventually winking at flagrant sin in his sons.


Without Restraint

Commentary by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Paul describes the latter times, when people will behave like spoiled brats, cursing, looting, and showing no self-control—all happening today.


Rejoice in What We Are

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh exhorts us to consider what God is working out in our lives. We usually tend to compare ourselves not with the majority of the world, who are worse off than we are, but with a set of high-achievers (such as the NASA astronauts who walked on the moon), possibly lusting after their property and attainment. We can …


Avoiding Spiritual Burnout

Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

John Reid, drawing on an example of an exhausted military medic, explores the problem of burnout with the attending symptoms of collapse, callousness, and giving up. The inability of solving mounting cultural and social problems despite advances in technology puts a strain on anyone who cares about the consequences, especially …


Lamentations (Part Four)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, while acknowledging that technology has given modern culture some marked advantages over ancient societies, laments that the fields of psychology (with its propensity to deny sin) and mental health have not kept up with advances in the "hard" sciences. Instead of resolving basic interior problems, modern …


Our Hope

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Our hope is based on having a living Savior. At times we are discouraged and overwhelmed, but God has not left us—though unseen, He is in the trials with us.


Vanity (Part 2)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

In this conclusion to the two-part vanity series, John Ritenbaugh bridges the Old and New Testament understanding on this vast, sprawling subject. Solomon's statement that all of life is vanity (transitory, useless, and illusory) is only true if one is not privy to God's ultimate purpose for mankind. Paul describes what God is …


Leadership and the Covenants (Part Thirteen)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

God is at work producing leadership in an organization that will follow Him, calling people into His family, carefully crafting it into a perfect organism.


Jesus Christ's Trial (Part Four)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, affirming that Jesus Christ is the Source of the truth and the only way to God, claims that the truth could be arrived at by framing it both in a negation (what it is not) and affirmation (what it is), as is seen by Jesus Christ's claim to be a king. Pilate's cynical appraisal of the truth identifies him as a …