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Parable of the Unjust Steward

Go to Bible verses for: Parable of the Unjust Steward

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Sermon; Nov 3, 2018
The Peter Principle

Mike Ford, reviewing Laurence Peter's "Peter Principle," the concept that people in a hierarchy tend to rise to their "level of incompetence," introduces a more encouraging spiritual Peter Principle, based on the life and experiences of the apostle Peter, who learned that, as one uses the power provided by God's Holy Spirit, even one who has previously failed miserably can rise to astounding levels of spiritual competence. God has given His people, the weak of the world, spiritual gifts, which, if used to edify others, will lead to a yet higher level of gifting. We are all stewards or managers of God's property. If we are vigilant, God will reward us for our stewardship. When we use our gifts to edify others, we demonstrate responsibility, but when we use them selfishly to glorify ourselves, we act irresponsibly. Many politicians and civil servants demonstrate fiscal incompetence, wasting taxpayer's money. As stewards of God's property, we dare not emulate irresponsible administrators. We do not know when our Master will return, but we do know: (1) If we get puffed up with pride, we will let prayer and Bible study slip through the cracks. (2) If we watch the clock rather than take care of business, we are unproductive servants. (3) If we are more concerned about the faults of our spiritual siblings than faithfully cultivating our spiritual gifts, we become busybodies. If we apply the spiritual Peter Principle, using God's spiritual gifts to edify others, we will continue to grow spiritually.

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Sermonette; May 20, 2018
Privilege, Responsibility, and Judgment

John Ritenbaugh states that every nation has its privileged—whether they are royalty, wealthy oligarchs, politicians, athletes, or entertainers. Surprisingly though, the masses have privileges which they do not recognize as such, namely the privileges of sight, hearing, walking and speech. God has provided in His Holiness Code proscriptions against taking advantage of those who are handicapped. Additionally, those God has blessed with material wealth have obligations to help the poor, as is seen in the command to avoid gleaning the corners of the fields. Our welfare programs have scriptural principles as their general inspiration, but unfortunately, politicians have abused these programs, encouraging on the part of recipients a toxic dependency which God never intended. Living in a land occupied by the children of the Patriarchs, to whom God revealed His Covenant, is a great privilege. Sadly, the majority of physical Israelites have rejected God's Covenant. God has healed the spiritual blindness and deafness of the members of the true Church, the Israel of God, at the same time calling them to become members of the God Family. As we contemplate our offerings, we should factor this insight into our sense of gratitude and responsibility.

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Sermon; Dec 2, 2017
The W's and H's of Meditation (Part Three)

David Maas, in this third installment of the W's and H's of Meditation, reiterating the stark contrast between God's holy character and our inherent carnal nature, contends that developing the daily habit of meditation on God's Word (the very spigot of God's Holy Spirit) can displace that deadly carnal nature, replacing it with Godly character—the mind of God. Because character is the product of matured habits and morality is the product of matured manners, we must be content with beginning with small steps. Evidently, God does not execute His greatest works with frenetic bursts of energy, but instead very contemplatively, beginning with small and apparently insignificant steps, such as recruiting the undistinguished to confound the wise. By definition, meditation requires a tardigrade venue of solitude and quietude; hence, meditation's most fruitful time-frames are those moments before falling asleep and the time before the business of the day begins in earnest. If we habitually make God's Word our last thought every day, with the help of God's Spirit collaboration with our ever-active human spirit, we will be able to meditate on the Word of God "day and night." The key to our next day is what we think about before we hit the hay.

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Prophecy Watch; July 2008
'As a Thief in the Night'

A survey of the New Testament reveals that, though we may recognize the "signs of the times," we will not be able to determine when Jesus Christ will return. David Grabbe pursues the concept of Christ's second coming "as a thief in the night," and what this means to Christians in this end time.

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Bible Study; May 2002
Parable of the Unjust Steward

The Parable of the Unjust Steward has bothered Bible students for many years. Is Christ saying that Christians are foolish? Are we make friends with greedy people? Are we doomed to fail? This Bible Study answers these frequent questions.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; November 2000
Eating: How Good It Is! (Part One)

The Bible frequently uses analogies from physical life to explain spiritual principles. Food and eating are no exceptions. In fact, there are over 700 references to eating in Scripture. The lessons we can learn from them must be important!

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Sermon; Jul 1, 2000
Maintaining Good Health (Part 1)

John Ritenbaugh, using Paul's metaphor of the human body as the temple of God's Spirit (II Corinthians 6:16) insists that stewardship of our bodies or keeping ourselves healthy is (like the Levitical maintenance of the literal tabernacle) an aspect of holiness, promoting the strengthening of our relationship with Jesus Christ. The principle of dressing and keeping (Genesis 2:15) given to our original parents applies to our physical bodies as well. Good health is not an inherited right; it accrues as we apply God's standards and health laws to our behavior. Even though we may have inherited some genetic weaknesses from the sins of our ancestors, we have a God- given responsibility to maintain what we have been given in top condition, if necessary, glorifying God in our affliction.

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Sermon; Jun 3, 2000
What Does God Really Want? (Part 5)

John Ritenbaugh insists that true riches consist of what we are (or what we become) rather than what we have. True riches consist of those things that can be carried through the grave and into the Kingdom of God. The circumstances of our lives (totally determined by God)- health, sickness, wealth, poverty, etc. we could consider as the scaffolding for the building of character fit for the Kingdom of God. What God really wants is for us to see things from His point of view, making the right choices, consciously striving to build character, developing into His image.

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Sermon; May 13, 2000
What Does God Really Want? (Part 4)

John Ritenbaugh addresses the topic of stewardship, suggesting that what we are called to do at this time is to fulfill our job as a steward, entrusted with managing, protecting, preserving, attending, and increasing what has been entrusted to us- namely the fabulous wealth of the mysteries of God and our spiritual inheritance (I Corinthians 4:1). Our responsibilities as stewards include fidelity, trustworthiness, loyalty, reliability, and devotion to duty. In the Parable of the Unjust Steward, rather than commending worldliness, cheating, or scheming, Jesus commends the practical preparations for the future which He desired children of the light to follow.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Oct 20, 1982
Matthew (Part 30)

[Editor's note: the Matthew portion of the Bible Study begins at the 49min-30sec mark] Before continuing the Bible Study in Matthew 24, John Ritenbaugh, after first examining the role of the Levites, goes into great detail explaining the various roles or functions of offices of responsibility within the church, including that of apostle, evangelist, pastor, and elder- sometimes called bishop, presbyter, or overseer. All of these appointed positions carry the singular responsibility as shepherds to perfect, correct, and edify the saints, bringing the entire congregation to the unity of Christ. The series of events described by Christ in Matthew 24 should be compared to the six seals described in Revelation 6 and the seventh seal described in Revelation 7, showing a definite chronological progression from the Great Tribulation to the terrifying cosmic signs, followed by the climactic Day of the Lord. [NB: This series of Bible Studies from 1981-82 is incomplete.]


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