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Pure in Heart


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Sermonette; Mar 10, 2018
Think on These Things

James Beaubelle, acknowledging that our annual, self-inflicted review of self can be humbling and even painful, reminds us that God's called-out ones have a measure of control over their carnality which those remaining in the world lack. We also have the assurance that our Savior is not going to lose any of His saints. Philippians 4:8 reveals that God's standards are high. Consequently, we are to meditate on what is true, noble, just, and virtuous, realizing that repeated habits of thought lead to the development of character. Consequently, when we measure truth against lies, such as evolution or the Big Bang theory, we reject them as toxic inhibitors of character, concocted by Satan, the father of lies. As we aspire to be purveyors of justice, we need to be sure that our utterances contain no defilement; God demands purity of thought. Focusing on loveliness means being attentive to the invisible attributes of God, manifested by His creation. We need to intersperse our prayers with meditation, allowing God to speak to us. Our objective through continual prayerful meditation is to become incrementally more Christ-like.

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Sermon; Apr 29, 2016
Sincerity and Truth (Part Two)

Richard Ritenbaugh, recalling his underwriter training course at Transamerica Insurance, in which he learned of the hundreds of billions of dollars of fraud which occur annually in auto, health, disability, welfare, and Medicare, asserts that every part of our modern Babylonian culture has been plagued by fraud and cheating, a cancerous system described in Revelation 18, which God Almighty will have to destroy. In contrast to the world's embracing of fraud and deceit, God's called-out ones are obligated to eat the bread of sincerity and truth, not only for the Days of Unleavened Bread, but for our entire lives. As the apostle Paul warned the Corinthian congregation to purge out the leaven of malice and consume the unleavened bread of sincerity (inward activities), he knew that wickedness or truth are the manifestation of these inner activities. Thought precedes behavior; sin (gossip, rape, murder, adultery) begins in the heart. A heart without guile does not allow a poisonous foreign admixture. We must live our lives from a pure motive, unalloyed virtue, having unsullied Christian character with evil purged out. The Word of God is the source of energy to turn our convictions into genuine behavior; we must be, but we must also do, marrying our profession of true faith with pure unalloyed godly conduct. Jesus' encounter with the woman at the well demonstrates the motivating power of doing God's work as ingesting food. Worshiping in spirit and truth involves dedicating our time, and attitude in developing a relationship with God.

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Sermon; Jul 4, 2015
Psalms: Book Three (Part One)

Richard Ritenbaugh, aligning Book Three of the Psalms with the hot summer months, the Book of Leviticus in the Torah, the Book of Lamentations in the Megilloth, and Summary Psalm 148, indicates that this portion of Scripture deals with the somber theme of judgment on a people who have rejected their God and have produced a plethora of rotten spiritual fruit. Summer suggests military campaigns that have switched into high gear, a time when plowshares have been reshaped into implements of war, bringing on God's judgment on a faithless, rebellious people who should have known better. The 9th of Av, occurring this year the eve of July 25 and the day of July 26, constitutes the anniversary of the destruction of the first and second temples, bringing captivity for Israel and Judah for their overweening pride and vile sins. The major theme of Book Three of Psalms is that God wants repentance; He absolutely cannot tolerate sin. The keynote psalm, Psalm 73, describes the reaction of discouragement of a faithful person witnessing the prosperity and ease of the wicked person, while the righteous seem to be facing endless trials and harassments. When we finally see God's perspective from the tranquility of His sanctuary, we realize that the respective ends of the righteous and the wicked will be vastly different. We come to understand that not all who are in Israel are Israel, but only the ones with which God is working. The evil are currently in slippery places, destined for destruction, while God's chosen people, the Israel of God, are being groomed for a priceless inheritance. If we stick with God, we will acquire our inheritance in the fullness of time.

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Sermonette; Oct 11, 2014
Is 'The Leavening' of the Pharisees in Us?

Bill Onisick, characterizing the Pharisees as separatists, meticulously following man-made rituals and traditions, but oblivious of the weightier matters of the law, examines the deadly leavening of a Pharisee. The Pharisees performed their roles like actors behind mask, wanting the approval of men by his role-playing of piety. Pharisees are condemned for their proud look, their puffed-up attitude, their sowing discord among brethren, and causing contention. If we feel we are better than our brethren, separating ourselves from them either by avoiding them physically or holding hostility against them secretly, we are hypocrites and actors, harboring the leavening of the Pharisees in us. We need to rid ourselves of the pretentious hypocrisy of the Pharisees and avail ourselves of a pure humble heart, pouring out agape love to our brethren.

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Sermon; Mar 8, 2003
Is God in All Our Thoughts?

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting upon Wordsworth's lament, "the world is too much with us," comments that the fast pace of the world threatens to crowd God out of our thoughts. We cannot allow the cares of the world or the stress of the world's pressures, or the pride of the world to crowd God out of our thoughts or to defile our minds, bringing about abominable works or evil fruits. The spiritual battle we fight is in our minds and in our thoughts. We are what we think - what we put into our minds. We need to actively lay siege to our carnality and hostile thoughts, bringing them into captivity to God's Holy Spirit. Our thoughts determine the content of our speech and the contents of our actions- i.e. our fruits. What we sow we will reap.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; June 1999
The Beatitudes, Part 6: The Pure in Heart

Purity before God is far more than just being clean. John Ritenbaugh explains that to Jesus being pure in heart touches on the very holiness of God!

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; May 1998
The Fruit of the Spirit: Peace

We live in a world that has little or no idea what true peace is or how it is achieved. John Ritenbaugh shows how we can produce godly peace even in the midst of turmoil and why it is such an important virtue.

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Sermon; Jan 31, 1998
The Christian and the World (Part 5)

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that the prince of the power of the air (Ephesians 2:2) is responsible for influencing the Zeitgeist (dominant spirit or mindset of the time)pulling us away from God and His commandments. Our heart at the time of conversion is incurably sick (Jeremiah 17:9) incapable of being repaired, but only replaced. God deliberately places His called-out ones in a position of choosing the temporal allurement of the world or eternal life (Matthew 6:24) Guarding our heart (Proverbs 4:23) and setting it upon spiritual treasures (Matthew 6:19-23) will enhance our spiritual security.

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Sermon; Dec 10, 1994
Image and Likeness of God (Part 5)

John Ritenbaugh summarizes the true nature of God in contradistinction to the Trinitarian error: 1) God is not mere essence; both the Father and the Son have separate, substantive bodies. They are one in mind and purpose, just as we can be one with Them. Scripture indicates 2) He has the same body parts as ours. 3) He is located in one place at one time. 4) He moves about from place to place. 5) He becomes informed the same basic ways we do: evaluating, inspecting, and watching. 6) He limits Himself within the purpose of what He is accomplishing, respecting our free moral agency. 7) Having created us in His form and shape, He desires to develop us into His character image, so we can share life with Him on His level.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Sep 16, 1981
Matthew (Part 6)

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Sermon/Bible Study; Sep 9, 1981
Matthew (Part 5)



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

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