YHWH-Tsidkenu

Go to Bible verses for: YHWH-Tsidkenu



Sermon; Jun 6, 2015
Psalms: Book One (Part Five)

Richard Ritenbaugh, after reviewing the parallels of the five books of the Psalms with the five summary psalms at the conclusion, the five seasons, the five books of the Megillot, and the five books of the Torah (or Pentateuch), affirms that recurring patterns and themes can be seen throughout the psalms and throughout the entirety of scripture. Book one, parallel with the spring season, occurring during the Passover and Days of Unleavened Bread, focus on the Messianic prophecies, revealing God's plan to redeem Israel by crushing the serpent's head (emblematic of totally obviating the power of Satan the adversary) by establishing a dynasty of kings from the house of David (safeguarding the scepter in the tribe of Judah) to the ultimate fulfillment in Shiloh (code word for Messiah - the Lawgiver, Peacemaker, Redeemer, King of all peoples) who will establish God's Kingdom forever. The prophecies in Isaiah 9:6-7 and Jeremiah 23:5-6 reveal the identity of a child born to become a scion or Branch (simultaneously a root and shoot) of David, the Prince of Peace, Mighty God, having all of the governments upon His shoulders, ultimately turning them all over to God the Father. David, in his prophetic psalms (especially Psalm 22) did not experience the full measure of suffering he described, but served as a prophet (along with Isaiah and Jeremiah), graphically portraying the agony that would befall his offspring. When Christ divested Himself of His divinity and power, He was temporarily a little lower than the angels, a vulnerable human being like us, but nevertheless in continuous prayerful contact with God the Father, having a full measure of Holy Spirit, enabling Him to focus on the enormous task set before Him to raise up a group of saints to follow Him as first fruits. Christ continually expressed delight in His church, His affianced Bride, whom He loves passionately and with whom He wants to share His inheritance. As Christ ascended to the Father, those He left behind continued His work, writing the Gospels and



'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; September 2008
The Third Commandment

The third commandment seems greatly overshadowed by "bigger" ones like the first, second, and fourth. Yet, despite the common understanding that it merely prohibits profane speech, John Ritenbaugh contends that it is far more—to the point that it regulates the purity and quality of our worship of the great God.



'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; March 1997
The Third Commandment (1997)

Many people think the third commandment deals only with euphemisms and swearing, but it actually goes much deeper than that! John Ritenbaugh explains that this commandment regulates the quality of our worship and involves glorifying God in every aspect of life.



Sermon; Jul 16, 1993
Holiness (Part 1)

John Ritenbaugh reveals that taking God's name in vain is far more serious than swearing or profanity. To appropriate the name of God means to represent His attributes, character and nature. God's names are the signposts or revelators of His nature and descriptors of His activities. The glory of God was revealed through Christ by what He said and did- His entire repertoire of behavior. Our daily behavior, likewise, must imitate Christ just as Christ's behavior revealed God the Father. Behaving in a Godly manner enables us to know God and live a quality life. The third commandment has to do with the quality of our personal witness to everything the name we bear implies. Profaning or blaspheming God's name implies living in a manner inconsistent with God's name.



Sermon/Bible Study; Aug 6, 1988
The Commandments (Part 4)

John Ritenbaugh, suggesting that the prohibition against taking God's name in vain is the least understood commandment, asserts that the names of God (more than 250 mentioned in the Scriptures, eight of them concentrated in Psalm 23) represent the multitudinous characteristics, traits, attributes, or the very character or nature of God Almighty. Through the life, words, and works of Jesus Christ (The Way), we can see God the Father revealed. If we faithfully follow His example (emulating His life), we will not only find the Father, but also bring respect for God's character by our conduct. Eternal life is to know God by emulating His Character- living life as God lives life. Our most valuable asset we have is God's family name. When we bear God's name (which we acquire through our calling and baptism) we are also obligated to bear His character and nature, and not dishonor or blaspheme His precious name through our conduct.


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