Sin
Sin

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Judges, Book of


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Sermon; Jul 30, 2016
What Are You Going To Do About It?

Charles Whitaker, acknowledging that evil change agents have threatened to destroy society as we know it, suggests that these nefarious forces are no longer on the fringe, but receive widespread support from political parties, banks, and judges. These agents include feminists obsessed with child murder, climate change environmentalists determined to lower our standard of living to that of cave dwellers, globalists working to destroy manufacturing jobs, replacing them with service sector jobs and homosexual activist groups determined to undermine the family. These evil people, who have replaced conscience with communitarianism, have proclaimed themselves the movers and shakers of our civilization, disdainfully referring to the rest of us as country bumpkins. As God's called-out ones, whose citizenship in Heaven, we realize that activism is not the godly response to social ills, just as playing dead is not God's way either. During the time of Judges, when the moral malaise of Israel resembled that of today, God's people regularly called out to Him, and received a measure of relief from the otherwise oppressive evil. Similarly, we are obligated to regularly call out to God in an intercessory role for our nation—- and for the Brethren as they are impacted by evil doers. God responds to the heart-felt petitions of His people, and He can intervene in what otherwise seems like hopeless situations, giving us peace and quiet. Regardless of the moral turpitude of our leaders, God has commanded us to pray for them so that our lives be peaceful. We need to be eternally vigilant of our surroundings, avoiding unsavory people, praying for insight or a way of escape as well as the courage to take the way of escape, and to see God's hand at work in our life. We need to repeatedly thank God that He is undisputed Ruler of creation.

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Sermonette; Aug 29, 2015
Israel, Selfies, and Idolatry

Mike Ford cues in on the narrative about the religious hobbyist, Micah, in Judges 17, who practiced his own self-devised hybrid of religion, amalgamating some orthodox truth with abundant noxious, pagan admixtures, bringing a curse on himself and his community. Heretofore, when strong leadership existed, idolatry was held in check, but by chapter 17, the train (of undefiled worship) begins to go off the track. We cannot take anything from paganism and use it to worship God. Micah was a thief, having stolen the life savings from his mother, but returned it when she cursed the thief. Upon the return of the silver, Micah's mother blessed him profusely and then she had an idol made of the silver. Micah had procured an ephod and presumptuously consecrated his son a priest. Adam Clarke gives him a pass, claiming he was only replicating the temple in Shiloh and was merely worshiping the true God. But the preponderance of the evidence does not support Adam Clarke's faulty assumption that the ephod was connected only to the worship of the true God. Gideon's ephod, for example, became an idol. Some contemporaries of Gideon and Micah liked to dress idols in ephods, attempting to give them religious legitimacy. Micah and his household had abundant teraphim (or household idols like the ones possessed by Laban), negating the pure intentions ascribed to Micah by Adam Clarke. Albert Barnes makes the absurd assumption that the Hebrew people during the time of the Judges were illiterate. Micah certainly knew the laws of God, but he was enamored of the pagan rites, and tried to blend them into the worship of God. When Micah drafted the young, itinerant Levite, a grandson of Moses, he persuaded him to continue in the syncretized pagan rites. These presumptuous actions of Micah were disgusting in the eyes of God; it is dangerous to extrapolate anything from paganism to worship God just because we personally feel good about it.

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Sermon; Sep 25, 2014
Israel's Immigration Problem

John Ritenbaugh, comparing the events of the day of Noah with today's society, suggests that the explosion of knowledge taking place has an enervating and wearying effect. While the world's never-ending news is distracting us, Satan has another scheme operating, diluting Israel's integrity and power by the illegal immigration schemes devised by liberal 'progressive' and 'humanistic' mindsets. Foreigners that European countries invited in to help with the labor shortage brought in the radical Islamic culture, destabilizing the host culture. Economically, the alien has enslaved modern Israel by becoming the lender, putting an iron yoke around the necks of the people in the host nations, as described by the curses in Deuteronomy 28. The Tower of Babel provides a record of what happens when people mass together, combining their skills for an evil purpose. God set the Israelitish people in the choice parts of the world, giving them instructions to dress and keep it, giving the Gentiles other portions of the world, distributing the population in an orderly manner. Barack Obama has proved himself a Gentile leader, not qualified to serve as king over modern Israel, a leader loyal to Muslim principles, hostile to America, hostile to biblical principles and the covenant made between Israel and God. By voting in this regime, we have laid the groundwork for Israel's destruction. If things continue the way they are, Americans will be prisoners in their own homes, as Gideon was in the face of the Midianites. A precursor already took place in Paris, with the Muslims rioting in France in 2005. ISIS is on our doorstep, attempting to make America a Muslim nation under Sharia law. There is a spirit, steeped in abject hatred for the 'host' country, influencing the Jihadist mind. The Muslims know who they are; secular Americans (who have glommed onto multi-culturalism) do not have a clue. Strangers who assimilate into God's way of life are considered as natives.

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CGG Weekly; Jul 8, 2005
'How Long, O Lord?'

David C. Grabbe:  Decades after the death of Herbert Armstrong, only a small percentage of the former membership of the WCG can be found following shepherds who have held onto the core doctrines of the church of God. Even now the law of entropy is proved, as the splintering and crumbling of the various church groups continues. How long until an "outside force" intercedes to arrest this momentum and turn it around? How long will we be in this scattered condition?

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Sep 24, 1999
Unity (Part 1): God and HWA

In this lead-off sermon of the 1999 Feast of Tabernacles, John Ritenbaugh draws an instructive though disturbing parallel between the warning given to Belshazzar and the warning given to the greater church of God. A major contributory cause in the splitting of the church has been the wholesale rejection of the doctrines Herbert Armstrong, under God's inspiration, worked to restore. When the shepherd was smitten, false teachers systematically undermined the faith once delivered. We need to realize that if God were not with Herbert Armstrong in those formative years, then indeed the handwriting is on the wall for us. We desperately need to hold fast to those doctrines restored through Herbert Armstrong's ministry.

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Sermon; Feb 27, 1993
Love and Fellowship

John Ritenbaugh teaches that God has given us a checkpoint against which we can check ourselves in times of despondency and despair, so whether we doubt, fear, or the self—whether the problems are moderate or deep—we can go back to see whether we are keeping God's commands and working on developing our fellowship with Him. God has created mankind with the need to face challenges—the need to overcome—or we quickly become subject to boredom or "ennui." Our major responsibility is to govern ourselves scrupulously and conscientiously within the framework of God's Laws, overcoming negative impulses by the knowledge and Spirit of God, seeking a total relationship with Him in thought, emotion, and deed, extending to our relations with our brethren. Fellowship with God is the only antidote to overwhelming feelings of despair, doubt, and self-condemnation.



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

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