Be There Next Year

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Members of God's church usually come home from the Feast of Tabernacles with renewed strength. Yet, some fall away each year. Here's how to stay the course.


Spiritual Satisfaction

Sermonette by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins observes that, when people are concerned about survival (as they naturally become when they fast), their minds become dull to covetousness. The Parable of the Rich Fool illustrates that, when one has all the material possessions he could want, he may still not be rich toward God—to the extent of abject …


Laodiceanism and Being There Next Year

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Our biggest danger at this time is to be lured into spiritual drunkenness by the pagan Babylonian system. Our God is not what we say we worship but whom we serve.


What's So Bad About Babylon? (1997)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Using the lesson of the Tower of Babel and the Babylonic system, John Ritenbaugh asserts that mankind must stop trusting in its towers—anything that we place our trust in apart from Almighty God (wealth, status, achievement, military prowess, scientific inventiveness, etc.), giving us an arrogant, self-centered sense of …


A Bed Too Short (Part 2)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Charles Whitaker

Charles Whitaker reiterates that Americans [and all of Israel], living well on credit, and enamored with the apparent blessings of technology , have deceived themselves thinking they have "advanced beyond [the ] consequences" of God's Law. Because morality has been left out of the economic equation, we are reaping the …


The Beginning of History

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Charles Whitaker

Charles Whitaker asserts that, if there is a defining element of the American or Western zeitgeist, it is the belief that history is progress: Mankind, along with his nature and governments, is on an inevitable course of advancement. This evolutionary mindset (called Endism) posits that human nature is evolving into a better …


Parable of the Rich Fool

Bible Study by Martin G. Collins

Even if we have everything we could ever want or need, when we die, our goods will do nothing for us. Because of wealth, the fool believes he has no need of God.


Lot's Day and Our Day

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

The West is obsessed with materialism and guaranteed security, as many institutions protect—even encourage—mediocrity, incompetency, and malfeasance.


The Christian and the World (Part Eight)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Having anxiety, foreboding and fretting about food, clothing, and shelter, or being distressed about the future, demonstrates a gross lack of faith.


Amos (Part 11)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh observes that ancient Israel had at the core of its religion (as well as its dominant cultural norm) an obsession to serve or please the self at the expense of justice and truth and the best interests of the socially disadvantaged. Because of Israel's excessive self-seeking and self-serving pride, God threatens …


Carelessness

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Carelessness, indicative of not thinking, when reinforced or carried on into life, can be lethal or irreparable. Undervaluing our way leads to a careless lifestyle.


Endure as a Good Soldier

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

In God's plan, the development of uncompromising character requires struggle and sacrifice. Our victory requires continual drill, tests and development of discipline.