Ruth's Prophecy

Sermonette by Gary Garrett (1950-2019)

God alone determines the course of history. His naming of people is significant, and the book of Ruth can be studied through the lens of the characters' names.


Pentecost and the Book of Ruth

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Although many lessons of the book of Ruth allude to Old Covenant teachings, Ruth prefigures New Covenant principles such as mercy, Christ's care, and acceptance.


Themes of Ruth (Part Three): Redemption

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Jesus redeemed us with His shed blood from the penalty of our sins, but He also works as our High Priest, continually redeeming us until we are resurrected.


Themes of Ruth (Part One): Naomi

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Naomi's attractive personality, selflessness, godly conviction and common sense characterize her relationship with her Gentile daughters-in-law.


Boaz and Pentecost

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The name of Boaz (a type of Christ) appears many times more than Ruth (a type of the church), indicating Christ's intense work on behalf of the church.


The Mixed Multitude

Article by Charles Whitaker

When the mixed multitude came out of Egypt with Israel, God gave them an opportunity to join His chosen people. This event contains vital lessons for us.


'How Long, O Lord?'

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

The cycles of Israel's history—idolatry, subjugation, repentance, deliverance—give us a pattern for understanding the present scattered condition of the church.


Christ's Female Ancestors

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Luke records four female ancestors of Christ: Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and Bathsheba. Three out of the four were Gentiles and 3/4 also had glaring sexual problems


Amos (Part 3)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that the Gentile nations without God's revelation were held accountable for basic principles of humanity. Amon's barbarity, Tyre's faithlessness, and Moab's propensity for sustained anger (exemplified by burning the bones of Edom to lime) and the desire to take revenge - God punishes with severity. God …


The Handwriting Is on the Wall (2002)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

In this keynote address of the 2002 Feast of Tabernacles, John Ritenbaugh focuses upon the prophecy of Deuteronomy 28:42-49 concerning the curse of the stranger rising higher and higher above us, displacing our Israelitish culture with an alien Gentile culture. Like leaven in bread dough, the minority alien cultures, further …


Abraham (Part 10)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh ponders the qualifier "righteous" when applied to Lot. Unlike Abraham who separated himself from sinful society, Lot seemed to involve himself in the affairs of the perverted city, arrogating to himself the role of a judge, attempting to change the behavior of the people- but nevertheless, attempting to …


Shouting Gleanings and Singing Olives (Part One)

Sermon by Charles Whitaker

Charles Whitaker, focusing on Isaiah 24, claims that the term "Isaiah's Apocalypse" is a fair epithet for Isaiah 24 through 27 because these chapters share with the Book of Revelation the theme of God's judgment on the entire earth. God uses the term "the city of confusion" to describe His enemies—and …


Responding to Catastrophe

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the Hurricane Katrina disaster, ponders the inappropriate responses of some Americans and our responsibility to learn proper responses. Negative responses include: 1) The Blame Game, exemplified by Adam blaming Eve and Eve blaming the serpent for their sins; 2) It's Not Fair, seen in Cain's …


Prophets and Prophecy (Part 3)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John the Baptist fulfilled the prophecy of the 'Elijah to come.' We must apply duality of prophecy carefully and cautiously rather than indiscriminately.


Lamentations (Part 3; 1989)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

As Lamentations opens, Jerusalem is personified as a widow who has had to endure the destruction of her family as well as the mocking scorn from the captors.


Balaam and the End-Time Church (Part 1)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Balaam illustrates the paradox of someone who knows God's will, but willfully and deliberately disobeys, presumptuously thinking he could manipulate or bribe God.