Psalms 90-100

Sermon/Bible Study by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, focusing on Psalms 90-100, suggests that these psalms are prophetic, having a definite time progression, especially referencing the time frame between the Feast of Trumpets to the Last Great Day. Some have speculated that Moses wrote all eleven of these Psalms, and some have even suggested that they should be …


Moses, Psalmist (Part 1)

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Moses was an amazing man. From his birth, he was caught up as the central figure in some of the most momentous times in human history. ...


Psalms: Book Four (Part One)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, reminding us that the four fall feasts of God point to future events, having a breathtaking eternal scope, marvels that only 18 psalms -or 11.3%éapply to these fall holy days. Book IV of the Psalms align with Numbers in the Torah or Pentateuch, and Ecclesiastes in theMegilloth. The first several chapters of …


Psalms: Book Four: He Is Coming!

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The Feast of Trumpets is like the opening salvo of the fall feasts, beginning with a blast of the trumpet or shofar, reminiscent of the event on Mount Sinai.


Psalms: Book Four: All His Benefits

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

All that we have has come from others, especially God. The Day of Atonement points out how needy and dependent on God we are; fasting shows our frailty.


The W's and H's of Meditation (Part Four)

Sermon by David F. Maas

David Maas, focusing on Psalm 90:12, an admonition to number our days in order to get a heart of wisdom, reflects on the stark contrast between God's robust eternity and mankind's fragile mortality. Meditating on the perils of our transitory existence paradoxically leads to a longer, happier life now as well as in the future, as …


Simplify Your Life!

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Time—it marches relentlessly on, and we have only so much of it. Yet we waste a lot of it on foolish pursuits, procrastination and distractions. John Ritenbaugh explains how getting control of our time puts us in the driver's seat in our pursuit of God's Kingdom!


Grow Up!

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The days of our lives are seventy years; and if by reason of strength they are eighty years, yet their boast is only labor and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away. ...


Vanity (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh explores the different nuances of this huge, sprawling negative concept, ranging from transitoriness, futility, profitlessness, confusion, falseness, conceit, vainglory, denial, and idolatry. Moses encapsulates the Old Testament's understanding of vanity, comparing the eternality of God to the brevity of man - a …


Numbering Our Days

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

We must allow God to show us how to carefully number our days in order to gain a heart of wisdom and develop a godly perspective upon our remaining time.


Commencement

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Graduations bring advice-laden commencement speeches designed to inspire and motivate young people, sending them out to their destinations and destinies.


Looking Forward (Part 1)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

The church may fear that the Lord is delaying His coming, and scoffers make the seeming delay worse. However, God is giving people opportunity for repentance.


The Song of Moses

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, asking us how much our time is absorbed in music, from elevator music, radio music, listening to CD's, cell-phones, computers, humming, playing musical instruments, etc. Nature is replete with the sounds of music: birds, crickets, frogs. God's throne is serenaded with choirs of angels. The Psalms are songs of …


God's Rest and the Millennium

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The Millennium or God's rest will be an exceedingly busy time, a time when all of humanity will be converted, a time everybody will be on the same trek.


Lamentations (Part Five)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, continuing his excursion through the Book of Lamentations, observes that the expressions of sorrow in the Psalms far outnumber expressions of praise, indicating that the Hebrew culture has almost made the lamentation an art form. An organizational pattern useful in the examination of these lamentations is …


What Does God Really Want? (Part 5)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh insists that true riches consist of what we are (or what we become) rather than what we have. True riches consist of those things that can be carried through the grave and into the Kingdom of God. The circumstances of our lives (totally determined by God)- health, sickness, wealth, poverty, etc. we could consider …