Matthew (Part Twelve)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

To establish sound doctrine, we must build on the foundation Christ's teaching, taking the straight and narrow course rather than the wisdom of this world.


Knowing God: Formality and Customs (Part Five)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The notion that it does not matter what we wear if our heart is right on the inside is foolish. Our clothing ought to reflect our inward character.


Matthew (Part Eleven)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on Matthew 7:13-14, observes that life consists of a series of choices—often a dilemma of a pleasurable choice on one hand, and a daunting difficult choice on the other. It seems as though God Almighty and Jesus Christ invariably want us to make the more difficult choice, insuring seemingly the …


Matthew (Part Twenty-One)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh


Knowing God: Formality and Customs (Part Three)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh insists that a Christian's perspective or point of reference should always be from God's point of view, as determined by the pages of the Bible. Our human heart, looking and evaluating on the outward appearance, perpetually drawn to the world, must be replaced with the motivation from God's Holy Spirit- cleaning …


The Ninth Commandment (1997)

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

We cannot measure how much evil the tongue has perpetrated, for falsehoods disguised as truth have destroyed reputations and even nations.


Penalty of Death

Sermonette by Bill Onisick

Gossip is like scattering feathers in a wind: It is just as impossible to reverse the damage done by gossip as it is to regather the feathers.


Twenty Years On

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

It just occurred to me that January 16, 2006, will mark the twentieth anniversary of Herbert W. ...


What does CGG believe regarding cosmetics? dress lengths? hair lengths? men wearing earrings? tattoos?

Frequently Asked Questions

As we grow in the grace and knowledge of God—becoming more humble, modest and holy—our involvement with such questionable practices should disappear.