All Things




All in All

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh contends that history is not confined to the past. We are actively participating in it just as surely as the prominent figures of the Bible. As citizens of Jerusalem above, we need to have our minds singly focused on the heavenly homeland w. . .



All in All (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The end of the sanctification process is when Christ will have defeated all enemies and put all things under His feet. Then, God the Father will be all in all.



Hebrews (Part Twelve): Chapter 2, A Mind-Bending Purpose

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

To counteract complacency, Hebrews warns against neglecting God's invitation of salvation, which He does not guarantee until sanctification has run its course.



God's Creation and Our Works

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Like Joseph, we need to realize that God—not ourselves—is the Creator, engineering events that form us into what He wants us to become.



Going On to Perfection

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, discussing our journey to perfection or sanctification, asserts that even though everything we need in this quest has been given to us, our spiritual growth is largely dependent to the extent that we believe (and act upon this belief) in t. . .



God's Rest (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The Sabbath rest depicts the miracle of conversion, in which the transformation of mankind into God's image brings about a rest in which God takes pleasure.



The High Christology of Colossians

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

High Christology as a doctrinal stance was not enough to prevent the eventual apostasy of those in Asia Minor. Doctrine must produce the right conduct.



Faith and the Christian Fight (Part 5)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh demonstrates that both the popular 'eternal security doctrine' and the 'no works doctrine' held by many mainstream Protestant organizations are destroyed by the remarkable example of Noah, who, by the generous grace of God, performed extrao. . .