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Mind

Go to Bible verses for: Mind

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Sermon; Aug 16, 2014
Defining the Human Mind

Charles Whitaker, beginning with a potpourri of examples from lexicographers on the definition of the word mind, treating the concept as a verb, adjective, and noun, and mentioning that the King James translators render some twenty Hebrew words and eight Greek words into the English word "mind," concludes that the task of understanding the concept of mind is difficult. In our current parlance, many associate "mind" with the brain, assumed to be the center of cognition and decision making, but the Hebrews, who did not have the word for mind in their lexicon, used metaphorical extensions, called synecdoche, using the terms "heart" (center of the life-blood) and the head (location of the thoughts) to refer to the repositories of the breath of life (ruach) given to human souls (nephesh). As an abstract noun, most lexicons will be limited because mind is narrowly associated with the human brain, having a cerebrum and cerebellum like every other mammal, but is qualitatively different in that it can receive both the spirit in man and God's Holy Spirit, making possible abstract and symbolic behavior (thinking, speaking, writing, and creating), as well as a docking mechanism for God's Holy Spirit. All behavior begins with thoughts. Satan continually broadcasts attitudes into our carnal mind, attempting to lure us into distrust and eventually hatred toward God's ways and into a narcissistic 'get' way of this world.

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CGG Weekly; Dec 12, 2008
Can Heart and Mind Be Separate?

'Tis the season of much debate and social strife between the Right and the Left over a perennial topic, the separation of church and state. ...

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CGG Weekly; Aug 8, 2008
No Works Is No Good!

The brain is unquestionably the most complex organ of the human body. It is also the most important ...

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Sermon; Mar 8, 2003
Is God in All Our Thoughts?

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting upon Wordsworth's lament, "the world is too much with us," comments that the fast pace of the world - the hurry or rush mode - threatens to crowd God out of our thoughts. We cannot allow the cares of the world or the stress of the world's pressures, or the pride of the world (self-sufficiency)to crowd God out of our thoughts or to defile our minds, bringing about abominable works or evil fruits. The spiritual battle we fight is in our minds and in our thoughts. We are what we think - what we put into our minds. We need to actively lay siege to our carnality and hostile thoughts, bringing them into captivity to God's Holy Spirit. Our thoughts (hopefully filled with the knowledge of God) determine the content of our speech and the contents of our actions- i.e. our fruits. What we sow we will reap.

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Ready Answer; December 1999
Purging the Rumor Bug from the Body of Christ

We all know about the church grapevine. It's very good in spreading news, but it can be equally as evil when it spreads gossip and rumor. David Maas reveals how gossip harms the gossip himself.

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Sermon; Aug 29, 1998
The Holy Spirit and the Trinity (Part 5)

John Ritenbaugh emphasizes that God's Spirit is the essence of God's mind rather than a third person of a trinity. With this Spirit, God opens our minds, dwells in us, and implants or transfers His Family characteristics into us through His Word (Romans 8:9-10; I Corinthians 2:10; Hebrews 8:10; 10:16). Just as a family member can live on another continent and still literally be in a family, so can Christ, the Father, and His called-out ones be "in one another" (John 17:21-22) united by the same Holy Spirit.

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Sermon; Aug 8, 1998
The Holy Spirit and the Trinity (Part 4)

Continuing with the definition of spirit, John Ritenbaugh explains that the preposition 'in'—as in the expressions 'in Christ,' 'in the church,' 'in you," or 'in the spirit'—refer not to literal physical dimensions, but instead our 'concern with' or 'involvement with' something. As being 'in love' or 'in the mood' require no physical location, or having family characteristics requires no family members dwelling literally in us, so Christ in us (Romans 8:10), His Spirit dwelling in us (Romans 8:11), or dwelling in the the body of Christ (I Corinthians 12:27) does not require a third person of the trinity but instead refers to absorbing God's characteristics through His Spirit, transmitted chiefly through life-giving words (John 6:63).

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Sermon; Jul 11, 1998
The Holy Spirit and the Trinity (Part 3)

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that spirit in the vast majority of biblical contexts refers to the invisible, immaterial, internal activating dimension of the mind. It is repeatedly linked and used synonymously with heart, mind, and thoughts. Spirit (as activated by such things as cheer leading and marching bands) has the capacity to contagiously influence behavior. Satan's spirit as well as our own carnal minds (Ephesians 2:2, James 1:13) constitute compelling and impelling motivations to sin. Fortunately God has provided resources to His called-out ones, interfacing with their minds, predisposing them to hear His voice, to know what He is doing and to develop a relationship with Him, preventing temptation beyond what they can handle (I Corinthians 10:13)

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Sermon; May 31, 1998
The Holy Spirit and the Trinity (Part 1)

John Ritenbaugh reveals that the architects and custodians of the trinity concept admit that it is a "somewhat unsteady silhoette," unsupportable by Scripture unless one forces external presuppositions, assumptions, and inferences onto it'as did Catholic theologians at the end of the fourth century. The Holy Spirit (designated as ruach in the Hebrew and pneuma in the Greek) constitutes the non-physical, invisible essence of God's mind (I Corinthians 2:10,16) which He miraculously joins to the minds of those He calls (John 6:44), transferring His thoughts, attititudes, and character, and enabling us to have the will and the ability to carry out the creative work of God the Father (Philippians 2:13; John 14:10).

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Sermon; Jan 31, 1998
The Christian and the World (Part 5)

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that the prince of the power of the air (Ephesians 2:2) is responsible for influencing the Zeitgeist (dominant spirit or mindset of the time)pulling us away from God and His commandments. Our heart at the time of conversion is incurably sick (Jeremiah 17:9) incapable of being repaired, but only replaced. God deliberately places His called-out ones in a position of choosing the temporal allurement of the world or eternal life (Matthew 6:24) Guarding our heart (Proverbs 4:23) and setting it upon spiritual treasures (Matthew 6:19-23) will enhance our spiritual security.


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