Sixth Commandment
Sixth Commandment

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Exodus, Book of


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Sermon; May 24, 2014
Psalms: Book Two (Part Two)

Richard Ritenbaugh, reiterating the five symmetrical and correlative sets of documents and events (the Torah, the Megilloth, the books of the Psalms, the summary psalms, and the five seasons), focuses on second set (comprising Book 2 of Psalms, Exodus, Ruth, Psalm 147, and the Pentecost season). In this section, the psalmist David invariably uses the term Elohim, or Creator, connoting power, strength, and infinite intelligence. As Creator, God has undertaken a physical and spiritual creation that is continual and ongoing. The psalmist want us to see the Creator who is in the process of preparing a spiritual creation, through the means of His law and His Holy Spirit, treading through a formidable wilderness, culminating in the Bride of Christ. David as a prototype Christian faced multiple trials requiring trust and dependency on God. Like the psalmist David, when we experience severe trials, we must learn to trust God, anticipating that things will eventually turn around for our good. We can distill valuable insights and lessons from the trials we go through, enabling us to grow in character, and to thrive even as we suffer for righteousness sake.

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Sermon; May 3, 2014
Psalms: Book Two (Part One)

Richard Ritenbaugh, acknowledging that the Psalms have been divided into five books, suggests that there is methodology in the organization, reminding us of the number of Divine grace, as well as a number of handy organization emphasizing groups of five, including the summary Psalms (Psalms 146-150), the Pentateuch, the Megilloth, and the Israelite's division of the year into five seasons. The Pentecost season generally corresponds to Book II of the Psalms, the Book of Exodus, and the story of Ruth, typifying counting to Pentecost (the 50th day commemorating the harvest), in which wave loaves baked with leaven (a symbol of corruption) would be offered. Themes of the Pentecost season include leaving the corners of the field un-harvested, the trek of the Israelites to Sinai to receive the Law and the Covenant (a marriage covenant occurring on the same day as Pentecost, depicting another marriage covenant), and the giving of the Holy Spirit on the anniversary of the giving of the Law. Exile, leaving, departing, separation, and redemption are also major themes of this season and Book II of the Psalms. The Book of Exodus also provides instructions for construction of the Tabernacle (prefiguring the church and a future nation of priests). The summary Psalm 147 indicates that God gives His Law and Spirit, building up the Heavenly Jerusalem through the redemption of a remnant (the redeemed outcasts transformed through trail and distress into the Israel of God), the Bride of Christ.

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Sermon; Jan 7, 2012
Psalms for the Winter Blues

Richard Ritenbaugh reflects that winter is a time of cold, darkness, and sadness. In fact, as many as 10% of people in northern areas have Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Winter can be responsible for melancholy dispositions, especially when people are confined indoors. There may be a link between a certain section of the Psalms and help for this gloomy time of the year. Activating God's Spirit by singing psalms will give us fortification, as the Psalms instruct us how to walk in wisdom. Meditating on the Psalms may be more important than we have thought. The poetic, song-like aspect of the Psalms makes Scripture memorable as well as memorizable. We find it easier to commit verse and music to memory, as opposed to prose alone. Many chapters and even full books of the Bible are songs, including Lamentations, Habakkuk 3, and large sections of the prophecies. The principle of gematria, in which each letter of the alphabet is assigned a numerical equivalent, seems to show that the number five designates divine grace and implies an association between Deuteronomy (the fifth book of the Law), Esther (the fifth of the Festival Scrolls), winter (the fifth season of the sacred year), and Book V of the Psalms (Psalms 107-150). We derive similar themes in these works, namely God's triumph in accomplishing salvation.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; February 2003
The Offerings of Leviticus (Part One): Introduction

The Bible is full of symbols and types. The offerings of Leviticus, though they are no longer necessary under the New Covenant, are wonderful for teaching us about Christ in His roles as sacrifice, offerer, and priest. And they even instruct us in our roles before God too!

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Oct 7, 2001
Deuteronomy (Part 5)

John Ritenbaugh stresses that the day-to-day choices we make have far-reaching spiritual consequences. When we incrementally learn to fear God, we make a choice to preserve our eternal life. God initiated our calling as an expression of His love and grace. Contrary to popular misconception, the law was given after salvation (as a consequence of salvation) enabling God's called out ones to get in harmony with His way of life. Upon receiving salvation (liberation from sin) our journey has only begun. The major theme throughout Exodus (and the whole Bible) is God's faithfulness to His people, demonstrated by His continuous gifts and providence. God's faithfulness is the foundation of our faith. We cannot live by faith unless we believe we have a God who is faithful in everything He does.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Jan 17, 1987
Offerings (Part 1)



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

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