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Values, Source of


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Commentary; Mar 10, 2018
Do You Feel Free?

John Ritenbaugh, examining an article by Guy Benson, the political editor for Townhall.com who sees no conflict between his homosexual orientation and his conservative views, suggests that his defense of his uncloseted perversity is emblematic of the weakness of nominal Christianity. The mainstream Christian churches have lost the battle against immorality, accepting perverted behavior as 'normal' in order to become more 'inclusive.' Many self-proclaimed Christians have come to argue that their perverted lifestyle has no influence on doctrinal purity, insisting that homosexual relationships are acts of love—the 'essence' of Christianity. These deluded people feel that their behaviors make no difference in the quality of their relationship with God. Sadly, most Americans share this view today. God did not gift us with His Laws and His spiritual weapons so that we can "do our own thing." God is preparing heirs who are just like Him—not reprobate children who set their own standards.

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Commentary; Dec 9, 2017
Learning the Right Things (Part One)

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on Proverbs 22:6 and the principle of habits formed early interfering with newly acquired behaviors, suggests that the rapidity with which ancient Israel returned to behaviors learned in bondage in their formative years derives from this principle. The harmful things people learn thoroughly in their youth will sabotage any helpful steps to correct this earlier enslaving conditioning. Forty years on the Sinai failed to wash out these noxious youthful habits and behaviors Israel learned in slavery. Jacob's children to this very day have failed to rid themselves of the disgusting compromising habits that lead to slavery. Britain is rapidly losing the culture war to Muslim invaders as evidenced from the major cities in Britain occupied by Muslim mayors enforcing Sharia law. The United States, for decades weakened by 'progressive' leftist Communist, socialist influence in academia and politics is following Britain's sorry, disgusting example. The sun has indeed set on the British empire, and unless some unforeseen repentance occurs within the United States, America will also fall into the same deadly quagmire. The prophecy given by Nikita Khrushchev on November 18, 1956, "we will bury you," seems to be coming true.

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Commentary; Dec 2, 2017
A New Medical Pledge

Richard Ritenbaugh, examining the current version of the Declaration of Geneva, as adopted in 2017 by the World Medical Association (WMA) General Assembly, compares the philosophy of this document with two of its predecessors: 1.) the Hippocratic Oath and 2.) the original Declaration of Geneva. The Hippocratic Oath is the ancient code of medical ethics in Greece, requiring the physician to uphold high ethical standards in the healing arts, promising to do no harm. Though dated, the Hippocratic Oath remains remarkable for its conservatism, proscribing abortion and euthanasia, while establishing a firm demarcation between right and wrong. The 1948 Declaration of Geneva was a reaction to the experiments performed by some Nazi and Japanese physicians in the 1930s and 40s. It stressed that doctors were duty-bound to protect the well-being and dignity of the patient and to maintain utmost respect for human life. In distinction to its predecessors, the 2017 Declaration of Geneva subtly alters the philosophy of the medical profession. Relativistic in approach, it rejects absolute standards of right and wrong, but rather permits the physician to yield to the whims of the patient, including their demands for abortion, sex change, and physician-assisted suicide. The 2017 Declaration conforms to the liberal's paradigm of the rejection of Christian values while furthering the deconstruction of traditional Western culture.

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Commentary; Jul 29, 2017
The Cultural Moral Norm

Martin Collins, reporting the findings of a recent Barna Poll, reveals that many Americans (especially the Millennials) have rejected the concept of moral absolutes and have embraced the treacherous notion that truth is relative, totally a matter of personal experience and cultural preference, similar to the state of affairs in Ancient Israel, as related at the conclusion of the book of Judges. Shockingly, two-thirds of the American populace believe truth is relative, while only one-third believe in absolute standards, mostly from the ranks of the aging baby boomers. Where there are no norms or absolutes, there are no guarantees of salvation, but instead an eradication of Christ's saving power, a misinterpretation of laws, and a sinister erosion of morality. Mainstream Christianity, turning grace into licentiousness, has promoted a narcissistic worship of the self. Those who are wise in their own eyes have less hope than a blatant fool. Paradoxically, the fool rejects the wisdom of God (the Gospel) as foolishness, but the 'foolishness' of God is far above the 'wisdom' of the world. Only those who humbly heed God's counsel are wise.

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Commentary; Jun 17, 2017
It Was Bound to Happen

John Ritenbaugh, citing an article about a transgender male entering an all-female competition in a Connecticut high school, besting all the girls, suggests that public acceptance of this 'transgender' aberration has imprinted a malignant character defect on our culture. Western culture has come to accept sin as a norm, calling evil good and good evil. Just as Satan told Mother Eve, "You will not die," so the arch deceiver has also convinced the 'progressivist' legislators, educators, and medical communities that gender is a psychological 'choice' rather than one assigned by the Creator. Liberal educators and legislators have marshaled a deceitful attack on God and have defined sin as normal and even 'delightful.' The bitter and poisonous fruit of this onslaught of liberal teaching is that our culture has lost its virtue. One Missouri state legislator stated, "If there is truth, there must be a higher authority to decide what truth is. If everything is true, nothing is true. If truth is relative, our property and life are in danger." We must fight to hang onto our virtue, or it will vanish.

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Sermon; Dec 3, 2016
No Failsafe Needed

Mark Schindler, establishing some foundational principles that God does not create chaos and confusion, but has re-established order after Satan's rebellion, points out the danger and folly of presumptuously choosing standards of right and wrong rather than trusting God's judgment. The essential dualities of the Tree of Life and the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil are also foundational teachings, explaining how mankind got into the predicament it now finds itself. Since the temptation of Eve with the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge , mankind has been plagued with the same temptation throughout history. Throughout the last years of his life, the lesson of the two trees was a hallmark message of Herbert W. Armstrong. This message was not the rumination of a feeble old man, but instead the key to understanding the relationship between us and our Heavenly Father. God is sovereign over His creation all the timeā€”to the smallest detail, having built into His creation abundant failsafe mechanisms mitigating consequences of a possible failure, somewhat analogous to the hold-down bar of a power lawnmower, preventing accidental finger-severing. God, in His sovereignty, has not failed. The free-will He has allowed mankind has led to some tragic consequences or disruptions, but none of these are outside of His control. God's way never requires a fail-safe because God is never wrong. As God's called-out ones, we must trust the sovereignty of our Heavenly Father, surrendering exclusively to His will, as did our Elder Brother, Jesus Christ. If we keep the law of God, provided by the love of God, we will receive the life of God.

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Commentary; Oct 8, 2016
A Political Hurricane

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the fallout from the devastating Hurricane Matthew, a category 4 storm, has observed that some have attempted shamelessly to politicize this disaster, foolishly proclaiming that this disaster was caused by climate change, global warming, or 'environmental racism.' Regardless of the subject being discussed today, mass media and internet social media have been deliberately poking political hot buttons, purposely dividing the people of this nation to take adversary positions. Politicizing issues serves those who seek to expand the legitimate role of government and to institutionalize current power structures. Politicizing is a grave evil because it (1) creates an "us versus them" adversarial approach to issue reslotuon, leading to internecine conflicts, feuds, or civil wars, (2) creates false dichotomies , such as migration or no immigration, disregarding the fact that every issue is far too complex to be oversimplified into terms of black or white and (3) trivializes moral or ethical issues, as exampled in the subtle intimations that one party promotes racism and the other does not, or that lawbreaking will stop simply by passing legislation. God's system does not(and should not) make use of politics, which is motivated by pure prideful ego and a grasping for power. When politics enters the church, disaster and division inevitably follows. The Church is commissioned to do God's will, not its own. Politicians work to get their own will advanced, but our job, as God's called-out ones, is to do God's will.

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Sermonette; Sep 24, 2016
Shane and Integrity

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on the 1953 feature-length motion picture starring Alan Ladd as Shane, an enigmatic gunslinger who rides into a small Wyoming town, in hoping of settling down and escaping his past. Soon, he is forced to take sides in a land war between cattlemen who want an open range and homesteaders, who want to fence in the land to grow crops and feed livestock. In one moving scene, Shane, who has been hired by one of the homesteaders, gives a lengthy soliloquy on integrity to the homesteader's son Joey, who has bonded to him as a role model, , cautioning him that a man can never escape his past, but must carry it with him perpetually. If the past is good, the present can't hurt you, and if the past is bad, it will haunt you. In Wordsworth's words, "The child is the father of the man." If one's life is based on a consistent framework of principles, he will have a harmonious and productive life. Job's righteous character was formed early in life; God did not punish Job for his faulty character, but refined Job, transforming fragile human righteousness into durable godly righteousness. Like Job, we are God's children, given trials to refine our integrity to be just like His.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; July 2008
The Second Commandment

Most people consider the second commandment to deal with making or falling down before a pagan idol, but it has far greater scope. John Ritenbaugh shows that it covers all aspects of the way we worship, including setting ourselves up in God's place by becoming enslaved to our own desires.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; May 2008
The First Commandment

Idolatry is probably the sin that the Bible most often warns us against. John Ritenbaugh explains the first commandment, showing that we worship the source of our values and standards. God, of course, wants our values and standards to come from Him and Him only, for there is no higher Source in all the universe!

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CGG Weekly; Feb 23, 2007
Shifting American Values

Richard T. Ritenbaugh:  Fifteen years ago, the subject of "values" was on everyone's lips, reaching its crescendo during the political campaigns of the time. ...

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Article; September 2004
Countering the Culture

There is no doubt that America's culture is plunging to depths many of us never imagined. To Christians, having to deal with the world is a frightening prospect. Here are five steps we can take to mitigate its influence on our lives.

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Sermon; Jul 2, 1994
How to Combat Future Shock

John Ritenbaugh focuses upon a phenomenon described by Alvin Toffler as Future Shock, a stressful malady caused by an inability to accommodate or adjust to rapid change. Over-stimulation and rapid change (accompanied by the death of permanence) eventually produces apathy and future shock. The antidote to future shock (or attaining the way back to permanence) includes (1) becoming goal oriented toward permanent things (Matthew 6:33), (2) making sure of permanent values (Deuteronomy 4:40; Hebrews 13:8) (3) working to build wholesome habit, custom or routine (Exodus 31:13), and (4) building quality human relationships (Proverbs 17:17; 18:24; 27:10; Ecclesiastes 4:9)

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Sermon/Bible Study; Jul 16, 1988
The Commandments (Part 2)

John Ritenbaugh warns us that where our eyes are fixed upon (looking to for guidance and direction) determines how we will conduct our lives. Like our forebears in Ezekiel 20, we have also been influenced by our father's idols, placing us (ignorantly perhaps) in opposition to God's laws and judgments. Immorality is the natural cause-effect consequence of rejecting God's counsel, forcing one to embrace evil as good and reject good as evil, totally perverting standards of morality. Rejecting the true God automatically leads to idolatry, worshipping the god of this world, a being bent on our destruction. Idolatry constitutes the fountainhead from which all other sins flow, all of which amplify obsessive self-centeredness and self-indulgence. We need to educate our conscience to worship (cultivate a relationship with) the true God rather than misconceptions manufactured by our misguided imaginations.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Jul 2, 1988
The Commandments (Part 1)

John Ritenbaugh asks us to reflect soberly upon what we have accepted as our authority for permitting ourselves to do or behave as we do— our value system, our code of ethics or code of morality. All law is nothing more than codified morality. Alarmingly, if one willingly rejects God's statutes and judgments, turning instead to his own ideas (or his political institution's ideas) about what constitutes right and wrong- he has become an idolater, subjecting himself to an alien body of law and morality, influenced by Satan, the god of this world. Whatever we choose to obey becomes automatically our sovereign lord. Throughout the relatively brief history of modern Israel, the source of law (or system of morality) has steadily and dramatically shifted away from biblical principles to human moralistic relativism — plunging our entire culture into reprobate debased idolatry- designating good as evil and evil as good. Displacing God's standards for morality with man's standards of morality is the root cause of idolatry.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Dec 16, 1986
John (Part 12)

John Ritenbaugh insists that because what we believe automatically determines what we do; it is impossible to separate faith and works. If our source of belief is not grounded in Jesus Christ, we will be held captive to our traditions and our works will be contaminated. If our belief is grounded in Christ (our Spiritual Bread and our High Priest), we will have a relationship with God and access to eternal abundant life, leading to works (fruits of the Holy Spirit) that glorify God. The word "draw" in John 6:44 implies that there is some degree of carnal resistance or reluctance to accept God's calling. If we do not metaphorically eat the flesh of Christ and drink His blood, ingesting the Word of God daily, we will die spiritually. The moral and ethical demands of these Words often make them "hard sayings," but yielding to these demands (having an intimate relationship of God- living the way God lives in every aspect of our lives) will incrementally develop the character and the spiritual mind, bringing about eternal abundant life.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Dec 2, 1986
John (Part 11)

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that we, like the crowds who rejected Jesus' message, have unconsciously absorbed a whole pre-packaged set of behaviors or attitudes (human traditions) from our culture, sometimes dangerously inhibiting the assimilation of the precious truths of God's Word. One cardinal lesson we glean from the feeding of the five thousand is that when God calls us, He not only realizes our present limitations, but also has a vision of what we can become when we combine our meager capabilities with His infinite power. Unlike the crowds in John 6 who tried to get Jesus to serve their own selfish purposes, our relationship to God should be one of total submission to His will, patterning our lives according to His purpose. The storm the disciples encounter on the Sea of Galilee instructs us that when we are in the midst of a trial getting nowhere, if we invite Christ into the situation (having faith He is near), we will immediately have peace. We glean from Jesus' counsel to the crowd at Capernaum that any attempt to fulfill a deeply felt spiritual need with a physical solution will never give satisfaction, but will instead lead to addiction, perversion, frustration and despair. Our orientation should always be on the spiritual.

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Herbert W. Armstrong booklet; 1974
The Seven Laws of Success

Men have searched for centuries for the keys to success in life. Many have found rules to live by to bring them physical wealth and well-being, but all of them have neglected the most important factor: God!



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