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Israel, Remarried to God


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Sermon; Sep 2, 2017
Christian Marriage (Part Two)

Martin Collins, reflecting on the dismal track record of a great many second and third marriages, suggests that liberals have sullied the marriage institution, ordained by God Almighty to be permanent and holy, elevating debased homosexual and transgender relationships, while treating God-ordained marriage with contempt, claiming that marriage is worse than slavery. Because of the hardness of their hearts, the offspring of Jacob are bringing defilement upon the land, reaping the consequences of covenant-breaking. God made us male and female, and has designed marriage to create one flesh, symbolic of Christ's love for the Church as His Bride. The evil of the mixed marriages in the Book of Malachi was a spiritual defilement, yoking spiritual and worldly elements, intrinsically unequal. Those evil men in Judah who rejected their wives, marrying pagan women, thought that their sacrifices to God would purify this violation of God's Law. Similarly, some in the greater Church of God (an institution which includes the Church of the Great God) have become careless in their marriage vows, beginning to imitate the world in their casual approach to the God-plane state of marriage. Sadly, certain individuals within God's Church are breaking both the spirit and letter of the marriage covenant, with callous husbands dealing treacherously with the wife of their youth, and wives similarly acting unfaithfully to their spouses. God hates divorce but has allowed divorce to take place because of the hardness of hearts. In the meantime, Jesus Christ, using the example of the prophet Hosea, models perfect love for an unfaithful spouse, taking her back after her display of hideous disloyalty. God's called-out ones resemble Hosea's unfaithful spouse, with Christ loving her and redeeming her despite her ignoble behavior. In our marriages, we must imitate the fathomless love that Jesus Christ has for His Bride—the Israel of God.

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Sermon; Jan 28, 2017
The Book of Joel (Part Three)

Martin Collins, reiterating that the devastating locust plague in Joel prefigures the devastating Day of the Lord, following a great tribulation and frightful heavenly cataclysms engineered by the prince and power of the air, asserts that God will judge with fury the heathen nations who have aligned themselves against His people. God will regather the remnant of Jacob's offspring, returning the land and wealth their enemies have stolen, restoring their inheritance. The plowshares and pruning hooks that God's enemies converted into weapons will prove futile against God's Army; they will soon rapidly unlearn war and the useless 'skills' of combat. Going to war with the Creator of the universe will prove an effort of utter futility, as the winepress of God's fury will spill an inordinate amount of rebel blood in this harvest of carnage. The Day of the Lord will certainly not be a pleasant time, but God's called-out ones are admonished to trust in God's sovereignty and His ability to protect those He has sealed with His Holy Spirit. In the fullness of time, God will pour His spirit on all peoples, including the misguided Gentiles who had formerly directed their hostility on God and His chosen people. In the meantime, it behooves God's called-out ones to cry out in order to be worthy to escape the horrid plagues to be poured out on the earth.

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Sep 28, 2015
Deuteronomy Opening

John Ritenbaugh, cuing in on Deuteronomy 29:29 which teaches that the secret things belong to God, but that God reveals things needful to those He has called, suggests that this principle resonated throughout the entirety of Scripture. Clearly, God's purpose for mankind for the most part is a mystery, and has been revealed only in a fragmentary part to those He has been calling and shaping through the ages. The book of Deuteronomy, given to ancient Israel as very specific instruction for those being prepared to enter the Promised Land, was intended for all of God's people for all time until His purposes have been fulfilled. The book of Deuteronomy was to be thoroughly reviewed every seven years at the conclusion of Shemitah (the year of release) at the Feast of Tabernacles. In retrospect, highly significant events, both in our previous fellowship and in the Church of the Great God, have occurred during or aligned with the year of release (Shemitah). Deuteronomy receives special honor, given to no other book of the law, having been placed alongside the Ark of the Covenant, as a perpetual commentary on the Tablets of the Law inside the ark intended by God as instruction well into the future. Because physical Israel rejected His covenant, God made a New Covenant with the Israel of God (His called-out Church), body committed to obeying His Laws with the prompt of the Holy Spirit. One Israel is converted; the other Israel, who has brazenly played the harlot, is not yet. The book of Deuteronomy, quoted by Jesus Christ more than any other source as bedrock doctrine, is addressed to the Israel of God, a group of God's called out ones who have been convicted that the Law has not been done away.

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Sermon; Aug 4, 2012
Hosea's Prophecy (Part One)

Martin Collins, referring to Hosea as the deathbed prophet, the prophet who was ordered by God to make a symbolic marriage to a harlot, declares that this heartbreaking marriage was to portray Israel's unfaithfulness to God. Interestingly, the Book of Hosea was written to people who considered themselves spiritual when in actuality they were severely spiritually challenged. We are able to understand God's love for Israel by Hosea's care for his spouse. Christ has purchased the church as His Bride, even though she has been unfaithful from time to time, seeking after signs, rejecting what He says, and going into apostasy. Because of Israel's unfaithfulness, it would be scattered (as symbolized by the naming of Hosea's offspring "Jezreel"). Gomer's second child Lo-Ruhama (meaning, "not loved" or "not pitied") was a child of harlotry. Her third child, Lo Ammi (meaning "Not my people") suggests that physical Israel would be broken off, enabling Gentile branches to be grafted in. Eventually, the millennial resolution will convert the term Jezreel from "scattered" to "planted." The negative prefix "lo" will eventually be dropped making the remaining words "loved" and "my people." The grief of Hosea gives a glimpse of God's grief over His people, providing for his wife, but receiving no credit for providing. God provides for His people even when they run from Him. Eventually God provides corrective discipline, metaphorical thorns, preventing further plunges into evil, in hope that Israel will come to her senses. Jesus Christ has taken our troubles onto Him, and will betroth Himself with a repentant Bride.

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Prophecy Watch; January 2012
Meet the Minor Prophets (Part One)

The twelve small books at the end of the Old Testament are often overlooked in the shadow of the much longer prophetic books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel. However, Richard Ritenbaugh argues that the Minor Prophets contain vital messages for today's Christians facing the time of the end.

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Prophecy Watch; September 2007
The Second Exodus (Part Three)

At some point in the near future, the modern descendants of Israel will learn of their true identity—and have to face the consequences of that knowledge. Using the prophecies of the Second Exodus, David Grabbe reveals that God will do what is necessary to bring Israel to the spiritual condition and the physical location that He has purposed for her.



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