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David, Psalmist


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Commentary; Jun 3, 2017
Our Participation in Services

John Ritenbaugh, sharing some insights that began to percolate during the funeral of Roderick Meredith, cautions that hearing but not doing describes too much of our behavior in our Christian walk. We should not trivialize the importance of music in helping our meditation and remembering spiritual lessons, especially the niche occupied by congregational singing. Instrumental music as well as vocal music has played a major role in services, from the time of Moses, a singer in his own right, David, who incorporated instrumental and vocal music as a Levitical function, as a means to set the tone of the praises and contemplations. The largest book in the Bible is a hymnbook, in which very intense spiritual situations experienced by David and others were expressed in lyric poetry. The longest Psalm is actually an acrostic poem designed for memorization as well as edification and delight. The Hymnal Composed by Dwight Armstrong sets to verse and rhyme the Psalms of the Bible, making it an ideal hymnal for digesting and reflecting the Psalms. The congregational hymns give everyone an opportunity to give a homily in melody, edifying the entire Body of Christ.

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Sermonette; Jul 9, 2016
Sin: The Wall That Separates

Ted Bowling, acknowledging that our sins have separated us from God, asserts that, if we want to walk with God, it must be without sin. It is for our benefit that God holds such a high standard; we would not want God to lower His standards one iota. The thick curtains separating the people from the Holy of Holies indicates the seriousness of God's desire to separate Himself from sin. The curtain. 60 feet high and four inches deep, dramatically illustrated the intensity of the separation. David, a man after God's own heart, nevertheless felt hopelessly separated from God as he penned Psalm 22. David's life was not the best all the time. Psalm 51 demonstrates David's desire to tear down the wall of separation. Sin divides everything; like David, we must be alert for distractions that will lead us into sin. Thankfully, we have been given a gift, namely Christ's sacrifice, giving us the boldness to enter the Holy Place.

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Sermonette; Jan 30, 2016
Think on This

Ted Bowling, asserting that meditation, prayer, and Bible study are inextricable, points out that King David commented more on meditation than did any other biblical luminary. Some synonyms for meditation include contemplation, reflection, ponder, weigh, and ruminate, describing what we think about continually. Contrary to false concepts of meditation set forth by Eastern religions, advocating losing control of the mind, God's called-out ones are mandated to maintain control of their minds, fully focusing on a problem or idea, using meditation as a teaching tool. David, in developing his meditative skills, in addition to scanning the heavens, probably also had a scroll of God's Law nearby, which he could ponder in depth, allowing him to meditate on those things which glorify God. Meditation proves a companion tool in prayer, allowing us to ruminate on specific occurrences during the day, enabling us to compare our choices with what the Scriptures teach us. We need to look through a mental magnifying glass, examining specific foibles or transgressions we have committed in order that we can repent with precision. As we pray for others, we should meditate to empathize with them, reflecting how our success in weathering trials may bolster them. Meditation, prayer, and study all one unified activity.

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Prophecy Watch; January 2011
David the Prophet

In thinking about David son of Jesse, we immediately bring to mind that he was King of Israel, a shepherd, a warrior, a psalmist, and a man after God's own heart. But we often fail to realize that, among his many other accomplishments, he was a significant prophet. Richard Ritenbaugh examines Psalm 22, a most clearly recognizable prophecy of Christ's suffering among the many psalms of David.

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Sermon; Nov 24, 2001
New Covenant Priesthood (Part 3)

John Ritenbaugh emphasizes that without the proper emphasis on thanksgiving and praise, our prayers degenerate into the "gimmes" with the emphasis exclusively on self. We need to learn to give God thoughtful thanks in every circumstance, including sickness, health, prosperity, and adversity, all having a useful niche in our spiritual growth if we cultivate the right perspective. While gratitude is a major support of faith, pride is a major exponent of vanity and uselessness. Gratitude is the natural reaction to what God has done. Thanksgiving supports true faith because it helps us to focus on the Creator rather than the created. If we see, hear, taste, and feel God in our lives, we should experience a torrent of praise and thanksgiving in our lives.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Feb 14, 1987
Offerings (Part 4)



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

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