Magic Doesn't Work (Part Three)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, reiterating that in physical and spiritual creation, God does not wave a wand, but does a great deal of work. Likewise, in our repentance, there is a great deal of reciprocal effort between God and us. In the stories of Star Wars, the X-Men, or Harry Potter, the protagonist does not grow in character, but …


Principled Living (Part Three): Growing in Righteousness

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, reminiscing about a school science fair project on tree growth rings, draws an analogy to spiritual growth, pondering what our spiritual growth rings look like. Because nature abhors a vacuum, once people rid themselves of sin, they must fill the void with righteous character. God's law'the pure, undefiled …


Spiritual Maturity

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The Kingdom parables allude to the process of spiritual maturity, depicting a planted and cultivated seed becoming a sprout, eventually bearing fruit.


From Rubble to Utopia

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

In this preview of the Millennium, Richard Ritenbaugh cautions that the Wonderful World Tomorrow is not something that is going to happen because of an instantaneous miracle. God takes His time to produce both physical and spiritual changes. Because of the massive destruction at the close of the age, the survivors under God's …


The Meaning of "In Christ"

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, continuing the exciting saga of captain John 'Blackjack" Geary in Jack Campbell's futuristic science fiction novel The Lost Fleet, points out that the larger than life propaganda image of captain Geary did not correspond to the fallible, humble, normal man who didn't feel extraordinary. He lets those …


Are You Fighting the Good Fight?

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Mainstream Christianity espouses the pernicious doctrine of, 'Let go and let God,'" which releases us from any obligation to overcome and build character.


Do You Recognize This Man? (Part Four)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Fruit is a product of growth requiring knowledge, work, patience, truth (light) and water (God's Spirit). Only by remaining on the vine will we bear fruit.


Our Part in the Sanctification Process (Part Five): Cultivating Patience

Sermon by David F. Maas

Numerous scriptures show the bad effects of impatience committed by ancient Israel, while the patriarchs, Jesus Christ, and the Father set examples of true patience.


Potential for Good

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Using the army boot camp analogy, Richard Ritenbaugh teaches that God places us through a similar humbling process, causing us to look at our sins in a spiritual mirror, contrasting our lives with the sinless life of Jesus Christ. In this process, we must (1) put out evil, (2) put on the new man, empowered with the mind of …


The Christian Medal of Honor

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, reflecting upon the Congressional Medal of Honor, examines parallels in the way God awards honor. He rewards patient and continual perseverance in good works, reflecting an inner nobility and character. Keeping unleavened is tedious and arduous, reflecting the narrow and straight way traveled by a miniscule few. …


Genesis 3:17-19: Consequences for Adam

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Adam sinned, having abdicated his leadership position. His posterity has been cursed with overwhelming toil just to stay ahead. We are perfected by hardship.


Magic Doesn't Work (Part Two)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh reiterates that people are attracted to magic because they think it brings quick results, bringing them their fondest desires, erasing their fears and providing for their needs, altruistically cleaning up the annoyances of the culture and the people around them, and fashioning the world around them in their …


The Most Dangerous Battlefront

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by David F. Maas

The most dangerous battle at hand is against our own flesh, where we least expect treachery and where we have become the most complacent.