Do You Believe—Really Believe?

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The death of Pope John Paul II and the election of Pope Benedict XVI made the Catholic Church—and the Catholic faith—front-page news around the globe. ...


We Must Believe!

Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

In an environment in which we are continually lied to (in politics, popular media, marketing techniques, insurance adjustment, etc.) it is no wonder that our faith in anything is flagging. Nevertheless, we are asked to believe in a Being nobody has directly seen or heard, whose written word has been vilified and scorned. Without …


How Can We Measure Our Faith?

CGG Weekly by Pat Higgins

How do we obey this call to test ourselves, to know whether we are in the faith? A good place to start is to see how God measures faith, beginning with Abraham.


Eating: How Good It Is! (Part Four)

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

John 6 has always been a difficult chapter to explain. However, Jesus' teaching is clear. Here is what it means to us.


Faith (Part Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The example of Lot's wife teaches us that God does not want us to maintain close associations with the world because it almost inevitably leads to compromise.


To Watch and Keep

'Prophecy Watch' by Charles Whitaker

Is prophecy merely to enlighten us about the future? On the contrary, God's spiritual purposes for prophecy concern the subjects of warning and keeping.


Hebrews: A Message for Today

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The book of Hebrews provides reasons to recapture flagging zeal, focusing on the reason for our hope and faith, establishing Christ's credentials.


Faith and Prayer

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Constant, earnest prayer keeps faith alive and makes certain the receiving of the qualities that make us in the image of God. God's purpose comes first.


Do You See God?

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Unless we acknowledge God's sovereign authority in our lives, following through with the things we learn from scripture, we, like atheists, will not see God.


John (Part 28)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh explains that Jesus' caution to Mary in John 20:17, "Don't touch me," is more accurately translated "Don't cling to me." Either translation does not contradict the First Fruits symbolism. (After all, the Levitical Priests had to "touch" the grain in order to offer it.) Also the …


Unity (Part 4)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The voice of God, whether expressed through thunder, events of His providence, handiwork of creation, or the preaching of His truth, is recognizable to His flock.


John (Part 2)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John emphasizes the reality of Jesus as the Logos (a word revealing hidden thought), the manifestation of God in the flesh, emphasizing His preexistence and divinity.


Whatever We Ask

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, reminding us that Jesus, who spent a great deal of time praying, emphasized that prayer is absolutely essential to the spiritual success of our lives. Prayer (or communication with God) comes under attack if we live double-lives, giving us a guilty conscience, not practicing what we have been taught, giving our …


Eating: How Good It Is! (Part Five)

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Both food and information are readily available in the West. What is our approach to them? Our attitude toward and application of them makes all the difference.


Acts (Part 10)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that the martyrdom of Stephen, largely instigated by Hellenistic Jews, actually had the paradoxical dramatic effect of spreading the Gospel into Gentile venues, enabling individuals like Cornelius and the Ethiopian Eunuch, upon repentance, belief, and baptism to be added to the fellowship. Even more …


Preparations For Christ's Return

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the economic impact of presidential trips, indicates that the local economies in the wake of the visit virtually implode. The preparatory work of preparing the way for Christ's first coming was comparatively low budget, in comparison to the extravagance of Israel's leaders. It was more …