Are You Missing Out On Blessings?

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Often physical prosperity works against godly character and spiritual well-being. To be rich toward God means to seek His Kingdom first, live His way, and trust Him.


Why Do the Wicked Prosper?

'Ready Answer' by Mike Ford (1955-2021)

Righteous men have complained about the ease of the evil for ages, but what is the answer? King David contemplated this, and gives us the answer.


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Fourteen): A Summary

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Along with the central paradox of Ecclesiastes 7, the chapter emphasizes the importance of an individual's lifelong search for wisdom.


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Eleven): Paradox, Continued

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Hard trials are not punishments from God for unrighteousness but tests of faith in which He is intimately involved to prepare us for the world to come.


Deuteronomy (Part 4) (1994)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We must seek God as ardently as we would a physical love relationship, spending quality time with Him. If we make no effort, the relationship cools.


Psalms: Book One (Part Four)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

David reminds us in Psalm 37 that we should not be concerned about the wicked, whose destiny is to perish, and that the righteous are infinitely better off.


Reconciliation (Part One)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Jesus Christ placed a high priority on reconciliation, warning us that before we engage God at the altar, we had better make peace with our brother.


Too Good to Ignore

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, observing that everyone is trying to either get ahead in the world or to get by the best he can, suggests that a whole genre of career counseling handbooks has been spawned by this perennial need, among them Cal Newport's book So Good They Can't Ignore You. Newport takes issue with the cliché that we must …


Responsibility Equals Accountability

CGG Weekly by Martin G. Collins

Children frequently practice the same sins as their parents, and they receive the same punishment. However, each is still responsible for his or her own actions.