Why Do the Wicked Prosper?

'Ready Answer' by Mike Ford

Righteous men have complained about the ease of the evil for ages, but what is the answer? King David contemplated this, and gives us the answer.


A Brief Overview of Biblical Prosperity

Sermonette by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh focuses on Proverbs 30:7-9, in which Agur asks God to cushion him from the extremes of poverty or excessive wealth, allowing himself to live a balanced life of contentment. Wealth has a powerful influence on one's life, causing us to overestimate our own prowess and underestimate God's involvement with us. We …


Prosperity: What Is True Wealth?

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, distinguishing between prosperity and wealth, asserts that prosperity is success that comes to those who have been active in achieving it and/or by divine grace, usually as a result of effort. Along with material wealth are offspring, and spiritual blessings such as character or grace in the eyes of an …


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Ten): Paradox

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Ecclesiastes 7 contains a paradox: wickedness appears to be rewarded and righteousness seems to bring trouble. We must be careful in how we respond to this.


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Twelve): Paradox, Conclusion

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

There is a danger that arises when the righteous suffer and the wicked prosper: trying to put God under obligation to bless us through becoming 'super-righteous'.


How Big Is Amazon.com?

Commentary by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, asking us how long it will be until we are the United States of Amazon, stated that Jeff Bezos, poised to become the richest man in the world, having gobbled up over twenty-five lucrative dot com corporations, such as The Washington Post (turning it into a vicious propaganda organ for the far left), as well …


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The paradox of Ecclesiastes 7 shows an unrighteous man flourishing and a righteous man suffering. The solution to this conundrum is found in Psalm 73.


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Eleven): Paradox, Continued

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Hard trials are not punishments from God for unrighteousness but tests of faith in which He is intimately involved to prepare us for the world to come.


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-One)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, continuing his exposition on Ecclesiastes, focuses on three interrelated terms: paradox (something contrary to expectation), conundrum (a riddle), and wisdom (skill in arts, such as Bezalel and Oholiab who were gifted in a specific skill—or spiritual insight). We are called into the body of Christ gifted …


A Tale of Two Complaints (Part One)

'Prophecy Watch' by Charles Whitaker

The prophet Jeremiah was grieved over the injustice of the prosperity of evil men, dismayed at their abuse of the land.


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Three)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing in on Psalm 73:1-9, describing the despair of someone seeing the wicked prosper while the righteous suffer, affirms that it is a delusion that people in the world are leading comfortable lives. Christian living, while not comfortable, has a restorative faith in God. If our focus is on comfort, we cannot …


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Trials are a means to produce spiritual growth, unless we resort to super-righteousness, straining to please God by exalting our works.


Why Is Life So Hard? (Part Two)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

Some have a warped idea of godliness, not pursuing it with a desire to resemble God, but believing that if they are righteous, God will materially bless.


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Fourteen): A Summary

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Along with the central paradox of Ecclesiastes 7, the chapter emphasizes the importance of an individual's lifelong search for wisdom.


The Reversal of Human Will

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins suggests that Generation X spirituality is an eclectic, syncretic, self-centered perverted attempt at displacing God's will with self-absorbed human will, attempting to arrogantly make God's will subservient to theirs. God, demonstrating numerous examples in scripture of sudden reversal, repeatedly overturns the …


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Fifteen): Deference

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Solomon makes the subject of deference a major part of Ecclesiastes 8. Christians must always strive to see God behind those in power over us.


Psalms: Book Three (Part One)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, aligning Book Three of the Psalms with the hot summer months, the Book of Leviticus in the Torah, the Book of Lamentations in the Megilloth, and Summary Psalm 148, indicates that this portion of Scripture deals with the somber theme of judgment on a people who have rejected their God and have produced a …


Are You Missing Out On Blessings?

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Often physical prosperity works against godly character and spiritual well-being. To be rich toward God means to seek His Kingdom first, live His way, and trust Him.


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Nine)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh maintains that Ecclesiastes 3:10-15 constitutes a useful roadmap for the confusing labyrinth of life. God's ways are inscrutable to most people; grasping these revelations requires a special gift. Unless God calls us and gifts us with this insight, we will have absolutely no clue as to our eventual purpose, …


Something to Remember

Sermonette by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, suggesting that human nature has to be continually reminded of God's providence even when people are undeserving of the bountiful blessings. Sadly, our forebears often forgot the frequency of God's merciful intervention and declared that it was useless to serve God. Satan loves to manipulate our nervous systems, …


Psalms: Book Three (Part Two)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, reminding us that the ninth of Av, occurring at sundown tonight, July 25,2015, a time when the Jewish community will commence the fast of Tisha b'Av, recounts the horrific disasters which have embroiled Judah/Levi over the years, including the destruction of both Solomon's Temple and Herod's Temple, the first …


Malachi's Appeal to Backsliders (Part Four)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, acknowledging that the conclusion of the Old Testament as we have inherited from the Latin Vulgate does not have an upbeat ending, but instead ends with a threat of a curse, reviews the seven feeble queries made by the priests, questioning God's providence and His faithfulness, asking what good it does to be …


Malachi's Appeal to Backsliders (Part Three)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, returning to the annoying questions asked by the priests in the book of Malachi as to God's alleged tardiness of justice, declares that their call for justice was unwise, considering that they would be fried to a crisp when they received what they deserved. The same applies to us: we need to be careful when we …


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Four): Other Gifts

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

God has given His people tremendous gifts that, if used, will build their faith and draw them closer to Him. He wants us to succeed because we matter.


The Eighth Commandment

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

The eighth commandment seems so simple: You shall not steal. Yet, it seems that just about everyone on earth has his hand in someone else's pocket!


Deuteronomy (Part 4) (1994)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

God has invited us into a love relationship—one in which He has already shown Himself to be absolutely faithful. If we truly love Him, severing our affections with this world, we will meet the demands of becoming holy. God's Holy Spirit enables us to have this love (Romans 5:5), but we must actively use it or lose it. We …