Obeying From the Heart

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Failure to obey from the heart, and not having an accurate picture or appraisal of God, is the chief contributory cause of spiritual depression.


Ground Hog Day - Again?

Sermonette by Bill Onisick

Bill Onisick, reflecting on a theme in the 1993 movie Groundhog Day, in which a weatherman (played by Bill Murray, who gets caught in a blizzard he failed to predict, doomed to relive the same day over again until he gets it right) sees a spiritual parallel in our process of overcoming well-entrenched perennial sins. …


The Covenants, Grace, and Law (Part Seven)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The New Covenant was designed by God to circumcise the heart, making it possible for God's laws to be written in our hearts and reflected in our behavior.


The Covenants, Grace, and Law (Part Six)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Circumcision is a token, sign, or seal that one was the heir of Abraham. No physical sign has the power to transfer righteousness to the doer.


Hebrews: Its Background (Part Ten)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Parts of God's law are not presently required, yet not 'done away." Paul took a vow that required animal sacrifice. Ezekiel 34-48 shows the sacrificial law observed.


Hebrews: Its Background (Part Three)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The book of Hebrews clarifies that the persecution on the early church did not come directly from God, but He did stir the pot that caused the persecution.


Acts (Part Nine)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Stephen's martyrdom and his compassion on his persecutors, followed by the reaction against his brutal murder, resulted in a rapid spreading of the Gospel.


Resistance (Part One)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, drawing a powerful analogy from a book by Dorthea Brand, focusing upon strategies to defeat writer's block and self-imposed creative sabotage experienced by every major writer, applies these insights to spiritual self-sabotage, namely resistance (which is ground zero of our carnal human nature.) As writers …