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Ecclesiastes, Book of

Go to Bible verses for: Ecclesiastes, Book of

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Five)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that a life lived apart from God, under the sun, amounts to vanity and a fist full of wind. As we become aware of God's involvement in our lives, we begin to stand in awe of God, developing an appreciation for the proper investme. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Thirteen)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing onto Ecclesiastes 5:18-20, observes that we must do what we must to keep a relationship with God. Solomon teaches us that money may provide some security, but it cannot be relied upon for satisfaction; only a relationship with God wi. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part One)

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Among the Old Testament's books of wisdom, Ecclesiastes stands as one seemingly out of place: full of frustration, blunt, and even a little hopeless. However, since God is its ultimate Author, its themes are realistic and necessary for us to grasp. With th. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Thirteen): Confessions

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

As he closes the seventh chapter of Ecclesiastes, Solomon makes a confession about the search for wisdom, saying that, even to him, true wisdom remained beyond his grasp. Acknowledging this truth, John Ritenbaugh explains that, while wisdom will ultimately. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Three): Time

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Solomon reveals that God is solidly in control of time. Knowing that God is sovereign over time should fill us with faith in God's workmanship.

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Four): Other Gifts

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

One of the lessons of Ecclesiastes is that God is intimately involved in the lives and futures of those He has called into His purpose. To this end, He has given His people tremendous gifts that, if properly used, will build their faith and draw them close. . .

Ecclesiastes and Wisdom

Sermonette by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the writings of the wisest mortal man who ever lived, admonishes us that we must use our faith to follow what God says, acquiring wisdom and understanding with all the energy and resources we have. There is a vital linkage be. . .

Ecclesiastes and the Feast of Tabernacles (Part 2)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh stresses that God emphasizes the rather pessimistic theme of Ecclesiastes during the Feast of Tabernacles to show the consequences of doing whatever our human heart has led us to do. Without incorporating God's purpose (Ecclesiastes 12:14),. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part One)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Ecclesiastes is perhaps the most practical, as well as profitable, book in the Old Testament, providing overviews of life-guiding advice, essentially a roadmap through the labyrinth, which constitutes the Christian's life journey. Ecclesiastes could be con. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Fifteen)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, continuing his exposition on Ecclesiastes 6, appraises the book of Ecclesiastes as the most bluntly profound book in the entire Bible, pointing to our urgent need to develop a relationship with God. We did not create ourselves or give ours. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Two): Works

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

In his masterwork, the book of Ecclesiastes, Solomon frequently touches on the subject of work due to its central place in both human and divine life. John Ritenbaugh explains that God works all the time—in fact, it is the first thing we see God doin. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Ten): Paradox

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Ecclesiastes 7:15 contains a saying that does not ring quite true in the Christian ear. In this way, it is a paradox, an inconsistency, something contrary to what is considered normal. John Ritenbaugh establishes the foundation for a comprehensive understa. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Sixteen)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reminding us that Ecclesiastes chapters 1-6 contains a sub-theme of materialism—specifically an indictment of the supposed satisfaction one receives from it suggests that materialism contains no lasting fulfillment. According to some. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Seven): Contentment

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

A major theme of the book of Ecclesiastes is satisfaction. In his wisdom, Solomon assiduously sought out the answer to the question, "What brings a person true satisfaction?" John Ritenbaugh proposes that God desires far more for us than mere satisfaction:. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that the book of Ecclesiastes, a document which provides an overview of the consequences of life's frustrating activities, gives us directions for making it through the labyrinth of life. This treatise prepares us with helpful, p. . .

Ecclesiastes and the Feast of Tabernacles (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Love for this world will inevitably bring disillusionment. Because the world is passing away, our priorities should be to fear God and keep his commandments.

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-One)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, continuing his exposition on Ecclesiastes, focuses on three interrelated terms: paradox (something contrary to expectation), conundrum (a riddle), and wisdom (skill in arts, such as Bezalel and Oholiab who were gifted in a specific skill&m. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Eleven)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reiterating that, although Ecclesiastes contains no direct prophecies, it does not present Christ as Savior, it contains no "thus saith the Lord" commands, and it makes no mention of Satan, nevertheless it does deals with quality. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on Proverbs 4:7, maintains that our supreme objective in godly living is attainment and cultivation of wisdom, which consists of attributes giving us skill in living. We learn that the Book of Ecclesiastes has no meaning for someo. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Nine): Wisdom as a Defense

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Ecclesiastes is a book of wisdom. The kind of wisdom that it teaches, however, is not of the purely philosophical variety, but is a spiritual sagacity combined with practical skill in living. John Ritenbaugh explains that this kind of godly wisdom, if appl. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Seventeen)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that satisfaction in life does not derive from material things or wealth, by instead from an eternal relationship with God who has given us abundant spiritual gifts which we must reciprocate by developing skill in living from usi. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twelve)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the curse of a corrupt judicial system described in Ecclesiastes 5:8-9, warns us that corruption in the courts is a fact of life, but it will intensify before Christ returns. We should not be surprised by this curse, realizin. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Eight): Time

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing in on Ecclesiastes 2:24-26, affirms that enjoyment from one's labor comes from the LORD and that the proper use of our allotted time becomes increasingly more relevant as we anticipate the conclusion of our physical lives. Solomon in. . .

God's Sovereignty, Ecclesiastes, and God's Will

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, synthesizing the topics God's sovereignty, Ecclesiastes, and God's will, observes that God does not prevent us from sinning, and furthermore judges sin on a sliding scale of seriousness, based upon intent and premeditation. God has disting. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Eight)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reiterating the warning of the apostle Paul that evil company corrupts good habits, warns us that the desire to sin is highly contagious and is a deadly, communicable disease. Because the world we inhabit swims in sin, we have the obligati. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Six)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing in on Romans 8:31-39, cautions us that the study of Ecclesiastes, a work composed by a highly gifted man, was intended for those mature in the faith. Even those with God's Spirit find the book to be difficult, and discover that life . . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Fourteen)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on Solomon's ruminations about life being seemingly futile and purposeless, reiterates that a relationship with God is the only factor which prevents life from becoming useless. As many celebrities and public figures withdraw to. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Nine)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh maintains that Ecclesiastes 3:10-15 constitutes a useful roadmap for the confusing labyrinth of life. God's ways are inscrutable to most people; grasping these revelations requires a special gift. Unless God calls us and gifts us with this . . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Seven)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, claiming that one major reason people find Ecclesiastes to be pessimistic is that much of life also contains negativity, suggests that Solomon, who was born with a silver spoon in his mouth, found much of life discouraging, disappointing, . . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Thirty)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reiterating that wisdom is not the answer to all of life's problems, indicates that it is still a valuable virtue, transforming us for good and a sense of well-being. In the matter of deference to civil authority, we must remember that, as. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Nine)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reflects on two recent news items in which individuals foolishly initiated altercations with police and lost their lives in the process. As a matter of common sense, it seems the height of idiocy to challenge constituted authority. Solomon . . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Twelve): Paradox, Conclusion

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

The paradox that Solomon mentions in Ecclesiastes 7:15-18 is not in itself a difficult concept. The problem is that Solomon provides little in terms of an answer to the spiritual dangers that can arise from it. John Ritenbaugh reveals that a Christian's pe. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Six): Listening

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

When Solomon visits the Temple, he comes away from his observations of the worshippers with a sense that too many treat religion far too casually and carelessly, forgetting that they are coming before the great God. As John Ritenbaugh explains, Solomon adm. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Six)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the multiple nuances of the Hebrew words translated into the English word "wisdom," suggests that an acquired skill for living represents the common denominator in all of these definitions. Godly wisdom is only atta. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Five)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the unpleasant prospect of overhearing hurtful gossip about us from someone we have trusted, observes that, in all likelihood, our tongue has been just as detrimental against someone who may have trusted us. What goes around . . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Three)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing in on Psalm 73:1-9, describing the despair of someone seeing the wicked prosper while the righteous suffer, affirms that it is a delusion that people in the world are leading comfortable lives. Christian living, while not comfortable. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Fourteen): A Summary

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Calling Ecclesiastes 7 "the most significant Old Testament chapter I have studied," John Ritenbaugh summarizes the many lessons Solomon teaches in its twenty-nine verses. Along with its central paradox, the chapter emphasizes the importance of an individua. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Seven)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting that Ecclesiastes 7 contains some of the most significant concepts applicable to the Christian religion, identifies them as follows: (1) A good name or reputation (based on trust, responsibility, or dependability) is better than. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Five): Comparisons

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

The content of Ecclesiastes 4 is a series of comparisons based in the everyday life of a society—from the gulf between the powerful and those they oppress to the various attitudes that people bring to their daily work. John Ritenbaugh explains that S. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Ten)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, stating that Ecclesiastes 3 expresses awesome possibilities for the future, also points out that Ecclesiastes 4 reminds us that there are harsh realities for those living under the sun, making compromise with the world inviting. Many of Go. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Eighteen)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reiterating that the entire world is under the sway of Satan the devil (I John 5:19, Revelation 12:9, Ephesians 2:1-3), warns us to analyze and evaluate everything that enters our minds from the contaminated, mendacious media sources, medi. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing upon II John 5, an epistle which cautions about deceivers who would denigrate the value of work, considers the straining on the point "we cannot earn salvation" a red herring, diverting our attention from the true value . . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Eight): Death

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

It is amazing to consider that, despite the fact that every human being will face death, so very few take the time to contemplate it, much less prepare for it. In covering the comparisons in Ecclesiastes 7:1-4, John Ritenbaugh surveys the Bible's attitude . . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Fifteen): Deference

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

"Deference" is a word that receives scant support in these days of individual rights and equality. Solomon, however, makes the subject of deference—that is, being properly respectful and submissive to an authority figure—a major part of Ecclesi. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, continuing his exposition of Ecclesiastes as he focuses on a paradox which initially provides a measure of grief and anguish to believers, the paradox which shows an unrighteous man flourishing and a righteous man suffering, points us to t. . .

Pentecost and the Book of Ruth

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, focusing upon part of the festival scrolls (the Megilloth) read during Pentecost, reveals that although many of the lessons allude to Old Covenant teachings, Ruth prefigures New Covenant principles also, including (1) God's mercy and ma. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reiterating that a conundrum or paradox exists in Ecclesiastes 7:15, admonishes us that we do not leave God out of the picture when we evaluate the twists and turns of our uncertain lives. Because we realize God is involved, we should lear. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Eleven): Paradox, Continued

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

The spiritual paradox that Solomon relates in Ecclesiastes 7:15 is followed by a warning of danger about a Christian's reaction to it. John Ritenbaugh assures us that confounding trials are not punishments from God for unrighteousness but tests of faith in. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Nineteen)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reiterating that Christ died to free us from fear of eternal death, reminds us that we nevertheless have the obligation to prepare for our physical death. When Jesus Christ holds the power over fear of death, we are delivered from the bond. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Three)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing upon the metaphorical aspects of work and walking, suggests that these activities play a major role in overcoming and sanctification. We must have a higher regard for Christian works than our everyday job, realizing that work is a. . .

Wisdom for the Young (Part Three)

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Ecclesiastes 2 records what Solomon experienced when he was a young man in the prime of his wealth and power. ...

Crookedness

'Ready Answer' by David C. Grabbe

Solomon states succinctly in Ecclesiastes 1:15, "What is crooked cannot be made straight," a truism that most people with a little experience in life know to be the case. Harsh words cannot be unsaid. Wicked deeds cannot be undone. David Grabbe explains th. . .

An Exhortation for Young Adults

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the recent untimely death of Amanda Allen , focuses on some lyrics of a popular song recorded in 1975 by Matt Monro, titled "Yesterday When I Was Young." Sadly, wisdom is not a trait valued or acquired by youth, but. . .

The Vicissitudes of Old Age

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on his memory of a local legend in his youth, an 85-year-old woman named Mother Barker, who frequently walked several miles, doggedly sacrificing for her family by toting groceries and provisions, makes several observations abou. . .

Death Is Not the End (Part Four)

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

This world views death as more than just an end of life—as THE end. While the various religions and some philosophies dangle an afterlife of some sort before their adherents, the fear of the unknown after we breathe our last breath transforms death i. . .

The W's and H's of Meditation (Part Four)

Sermon by David F. Maas

David Maas, focusing on Psalm 90:12, an admonition to number our days in order to get a heart of wisdom, launches the fourth installment of the W's and H's of Meditation, reflecting on the stark contrast between God's robust eternity and mankind's fragile . . .

The Fruit of the Spirit: Joy

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Joy is more than just happiness. There is a joy that God gives, through the action of His Spirit in us, that far exceeds mere human cheerfulness.

Sin (Part 2)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh examines those sins done in ignorance, negligence, or missing the mark, suggesting that those thoughts, words, or behaviors not in alignment with the mind of God (which should be our inward standard of righteousness) are also flagrant viola. . .


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