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Grave, the

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Sermonette; Oct 24, 2016
The Light of the World

David Grabbe, reminding us that the "last great day of the Feast" is not the Eighth Day, asserts that everything from John 8:1 through John 10:21 took place on the Eighth Day. A common theme of His teachings on that day revolved around light and darkness, and twice on that Holy Day He proclaimed that He is the Light of the World. Light represents abundant life, truth, purity, and enlightenment, overcoming the depravity of sin and the darkness of ignorance and death. To give light is the essence of resurrecting them to life; as the Light of the world, Jesus can teach us to see what is right and the safe way to walk, shining brightly on the pitfalls of sin. Jesus is the only hope for those who dwell in darkness. On the eighth day, following the Millennium, the whole world will walk in the light as the New Jerusalem descends out of Heaven, fulfilling in the ultimate sense, " Let there be Light" God will be all in all. May God speed the Eighth and glorious day.

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Sermonette; Mar 19, 2016
The Rest of the Sign of Jonah

David Grabbe, focusing on the sign of Jonah, asserts that there is much more to it than the timing of three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, debunking the nonsense of a Friday afternoon 'good' Friday to Sunday Morning "Easter" cycle. It appears likely that Jonah may have been literally dead when he was cast into the sea, with the great fish serving as his coffin rather than his domicile for that time. When God then resurrected Jonah, the reluctant prophet preached a powerful message of repentance, leading the entire population of Nineveh to fast and repent, sparing them from destruction. Jonah had fled from his responsibility, opting for self-sacrifice rather than to be used by God for something he considered distasteful, facilitating the future demise of his people. All of us have similarly turned away from God's will for us; it should come as no surprise that God lovingly sends disruptions our way to get us back on His trajectory. Both Jonah and Jesus Christ were prophets of God, preaching repentance and seeing the positive fruits of their preaching. Both Jonah and Christ provoked their own people to jealousy by preaching a message which admitted Gentiles into God's plan of salvation. While Nineveh repented and was spared, Judah did not repent, and consequently witnessed their temple desecrated and destroyed, failing to see that when anyone repents and turns from his evil ways, God relents and forgives.

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CGG Weekly; May 1, 2015
What Happened to the Thief on the Cross? (Part Two)

Scripture shows plainly that Jesus’s body and soul were in “Hades”—the grave—for three days and three nights, starting on the day He died. ...

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Sermon/Bible Study; Nov 15, 2014
Disproving Hell

Richard Ritenbaugh, refuting the Pagan oriented concept of Hell reinforced by Dante's Inferno, laments that most of mainline Protestant and Catholic theology is hopelessly immersed in this false concept. The Hebrew word sheol simply means a pit or a hole where dead bodies are placed. Errant connotations evolved from this, including a void and a haunting, mysterious place, influenced by Greek myths of Hades. Realistically, when a body goes to sheol, it corrupts and is broken down by bacteria. Often, translators render the Hebrew word sheol (the pit) into the English word Hell (connoting flames and pitchforks). Jonah referred to the belly of the fish as sheol. In the Greek language, Hades is equivalent to the Hebrew word sheol, without any reference to flames or torment. When Christ went into the tomb, He was in Hades, the storage place of the dead. Hades and death are equivalent terms. The term tartaroo refers to a place or condition of restraint for fallen angels or demons, not humans. The Bottomless Pit was reserved for Satan, symbolized as a fiery dragon. The term Gehenna (of Hinnom), referring to the valley of the sons of Hinnom, was actually a place of refuse, at one time used for child sacrifice. It was consecrated by God as a burial ground, and later the city dump of Jerusalem, with a fire burning the trash. Jesus used this venue as a symbol of the Lake of Fire—eternal Judgment (where the trash and garbage are burned up.) When one dies, the body decomposes and consciousness ceases; the spirit (the record of our life experiences) goes to God for safe keeping. When Christ returns, He will resurrect those who have believed and eventually all either to life or condemnation (depicted in Malachi 4:1-3). The soul is not immortal; the soul that sins shall die; the wages of sin is death. The gift of God is eternal life for those called by God.

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Sermon; Apr 19, 2014
Behold Your King!

Martin Collins, examining the scriptures proclaiming Jesus Christ as King of Kings and Lord of Lords, rehearses the horrible trial and crucifixion of Jesus Christ, a mockery of both Jewish and Roman justice, a trial which acquitted an innocent man, only to have Him executed because of the squeamishness and fearfulness of Pontius Pilate encountering a blood-thirsty mob. Jesus was declared innocent multiple times, including by the thief on the cross, the centurion who speared Him, and others, but Pilate could not muster the courage to acquit Him. He did, however, write a caption above Him in three languages, Hebraistic Aramaic (implying that He was the King over all religious law), Greek (implying He was the King over culture), and Latin (implying He was King over all civil law). Jesus' sinless and faithful life qualifies Him to assume the role of King of Kings , as contrasted by some of the prominent kings of Israel (including Solomon) who seriously fell short of the requirements God established for kings in Deuteronomy 17:17. As an inset in this message, we are reminded that Jesus did not go to Paradise immediately after His death, but instead into the grave. The thief on the cross, as well as the rest of us, will have to wait for Jesus Christ's establishment of His Kingdom before we can join Him, ruling with Him as kings and priests. As aspiring rulers, we dare not compromise with God's Law.

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Article; September 2013
What Happened at En Dor?

The narrative of King Saul of Israel visiting a medium at En Dor on the night before his final battle is an anomaly in Scripture, relating the story of a "successful" seance. Richard Ritenbaugh dissects the text of I Samuel 28 to expose several common misconceptions about the events of that night.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Jun 26, 2010
Heaven Must Wait

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the movie the Gladiator, marveled at many references to the afterlife, observing that the notion of going to heaven has been borrowed from pagan notions of Nirvana, Valhalla, or Elysium. In this venue, they will be doing things there that they had not attained in this life, transferring earthly good times to a heavenly setting. Going to heaven is not scriptural. The soul is not immortal; it is equivalent to life. Mankind does not have a soul; he is a soul, subject to death. The soul that sins will die. The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life when we go through the prescribed process. The body returns to dust, decomposed into its elements. As we reach our prime, we begin degenerating until we expire, turning back into dust. The term Sheol is equivalent to the dust, the grave, or the pit. The body goes back to the earth. There is no consciousness or awareness in death, but resembles a peaceful sleep in which we are "dead to the world." Just as one can be awakened from sleep, one can be resurrected to life. God has appointed specific times for the resurrections. The pathway through eternal life leads through the resurrection, with our following Jesus Christ. When we are resurrected at His coming, we will indeed have access to heaven, but we will join our Bridegroom as He rules on the Earth. The repentant thief expected to join Jesus Christ when He would come into His kingdom, a future event to occur on the earth. Jesus spoke this pronouncement emphatically—I tell you today, you will be with me in paradise. Because Jesus was in the grave for three days and three nights, He did not go to paradise the day He told that to the thief.

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CGG Weekly; Apr 30, 2010
Death Is Not the End (Part Seven)

Richard T. Ritenbaugh:  It is wonderful to know that human life is not without purpose or an end in itself. ...

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Sermon/Bible Study; Jan 23, 2010
Is Your Soul Immortal?

Richard Ritenbaugh tackles the question, "Do we contain an immortal soul?" The prevailing idea is that the soul is the indestructible part of a human being that lives on. The Hebrew word nephesh refers to a living being; the Latin word anima and the Greek word psyche refer to breath. In Leviticus 17, we learn that the life resides in the blood. A body is greater than a biochemical reaction; the life force comes from outside the body. Elihu observed that there is a spirit in man, giving him the ability to think and understand, giving him a point of contact with God, separating him from the animals. Paul differentiates the spirit in man from God's Holy Spirit, dividing a human being into spirit (mind), soul (our life), and body (flesh). Nominal Christianity has absorbed heaven, hell, and purgatory from Greek mythology and the philosophy of Plato, who propagated the doctrine of the immortal soul in his Phaedo. The idea of the immortality of the soul is nowhere in the Old Testament, unless one deliberately distorts the account of Enoch's translation and the witch of Endor. Genesis 2:16-17 affirms that it is possible to die, and Ezekiel 18:4 and 20 affirm that the soul (the life) that sins shall die. Galatians 3:22 indicates that all have sinned. Eternal life must come as a gift, but it is not something we have right now, except as an earnest payment. Hebrews 9:27 reminds us that we all die once. God keeps our human spirit in reserve for safe-keeping until the resurrection from the dead.

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Prophecy Watch; August 2004
The Four Horsemen (Part Five): The Pale Horse

The last of the Four Horsemen, named Death, rides a ghastly pale horse and is accompanied by Hades. In this concluding installment, Richard Ritenbaugh explains these symbols, reiterating that the horsemen picture God's judgment due to man's rejection of His way of life.

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Bible Study; July 2004
Parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man (Part One)

The Parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man illustrates the resurrections from the dead and the Second Death. Martin Collins explains how knowing the time element hidden within the parable opens up the meaning of Christ's teaching.

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Article; July 1996
Taking It Through the Grave

As Christians, we have to live life with the thought that some things will stick with us through the grave. Bill Gray explains that we will take nothing out of this life except our character.

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Oct 19, 1992
The Second Resurrection

John Ritenbaugh focuses upon the pouring out of water as a symbol of the pouring out of God's Holy Spirit during the Second Resurrection. The vast majority of people who have lived on this earth have never heard the true Gospel of God's Kingdom. God, not willing that any should perish, has a timetable, carefully calculated to allow people to receive and respond to the truth at their maximum opportunity for salvation, each in his own order. The Judgment indicates a process, requiring considerable time, a turning point, leading to a just and equitable decision. This conversion process, requiring the use of His Spirit, symbolized by water has already begun for God's called-out ones. Without the quality of life imparted by God's Holy Spirit, eternal life is not worth living.

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Sermon/Bible Study; May 9, 1989
Lamentations (Part 3; 1989)

Prior to the study of Lamentations, John Ritenbaugh, focusing on the subject of alleged out-of-body experiences, provides scriptural corroboration of their impossibility. In the opening chapter of Lamentations, Jerusalem, personified as a widow who has had to endure watching the destruction of her family, must also endure the mocking, derisive scorn from the captors. Although the United States, like Jerusalem of old (indicted for committing spiritual harlotry), has piously presented itself as the guardian of righteousness, it has, through its perverted media, exported more sin around the world than any other culture. Its humiliation and sudden fall will ultimately be apparent to even the basest pagan and most degenerate heathen. Trusting in adulterous political alliances or technology instead of God will bring devastating humiliation.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Aug 16, 1988
Acts (Part 4)

John Ritenbaugh marvels that human beings, having been given free moral agency, can accomplish what God had intended them to do all along. The apostle Peter, using the details of fulfilled prophecy (couched in David's psalms), convicts the crowd of their culpability (as we all need to be convicted) in the death of Jesus Christ. Peter clearly establishes the Messiahship of Jesus, showing His connection to David's prophetic psalms (such as Psalm 16) and David's lineage. The formula for receiving God's Holy Spirit—repentance and baptism is explored—and compared to current practice. The early church experienced a high level of cohesiveness by continuing in doctrine, fellowship, sharing meals, and praying together.

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Herbert W. Armstrong booklet; 1977
Is There a Hell?

If hell does exist, where is it—and can those who are there ever get out? Will those in hell leave hell at the time of the resurrection—or are they confined eternally to hell, so that they shall be unable to take part in the resurrection? It's about time we took this question out of hiding, and took a good look at it!


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