Share this on FacebookGoogle+RedditEmailPrinter version

Sabbath within Days of Unleavened Bread

Go to Bible verses for: Sabbath within Days of Unleavened Bread

Show more Show less
Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Oct 23, 2016
Pentecost - The Beginning - All in All

Mark Schindler, focusing on the seventh day, the last great day of Jesus' final Feast of Tabernacles, admonishes us to look beyond the significance of our own calling, realizing that the sacrifice of Christ was intended for all men with the hope that they also would be added ultimately to the family of God. We need to allow our Heavenly Father to infuse us with big-picture thinking, realizing that God's work is much greater than our calling, but is in fact a work enabling all of mankind to have access to God the Father. God has purposely given us, as God's called ones, the position of "trainees" as a part of the First Fruits to expedite this marvelous project. The seventh day Sabbath has always served as God's signature, a key to understanding redemption and healing. The seventh day of the Feast of Tabernacles contained a traditional water ceremony, which Jesus greatly magnified, prophesying that whoever drinks of the living water (symbolic of God's Holy Spirit) will manifest rivers of living water flowing from them. . Understanding the pattern of seven, the signature of God, gives us a deeper appreciation for the God we serve, enabling us to realize that the Great God has been working to complete His plan down to the tiniest detail. From the creation of the Sabbath and the annual Holy days, including the seven Sabbaths we count to Pentecost, we see how God is working to bring all mankind into His family in systematic stages, beginning with the First Fruits and ending with a great harvest of the rest of mankind in the White Throne Period, after which God will be all-in-all. The number seven is a kind of divine motif, God's signature, a signpost for His called-out ones to build faith, whether we consider the land Sabbath, counting seven Sabbaths to Pentecost,or the 49 years followed by the Jubilee, which typifies the eighth day, contemplating a grand expansion of the family of God.

Show more Show less
CGG Weekly; Jun 10, 2011
Which Sabbath Begins the Count?

Pat Higgins:  The Feast of Pentecost, the only holy day God instructs us to count, is just a few days away. For many years, the counting of Pentecost has been source of controversy ...

Show more Show less
Article; November 2007
Pentecost Revisited: Counting Consistently

This year, 2008, is another one in which Passover falls on a weekly Sabbath, making the count to Pentecost more complex. John Ritenbaugh, however, argues that the count need not be done differently in these particular years. All we need to do is to apply God's command consistently.

Show more Show less
'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; March 2005
Pentecost, Consistency, and Honesty

In recent years, the count to Pentecost has become contentious, particularly in a year like 2005, in which the Sabbath within the Days of Unleavened Bread falls on the last holy day. John Ritenbaugh explains that, if we are consistent in our counting and honest with the instructions of Scripture, the solution is clear.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Feb 26, 2005
Pentecost, Consistency, and Honesty

John Ritenbaugh, clearing up the needless confusion about the proper day to begin counting to Pentecost, examines the basic passages on it. Because Pentecost does not have a specific date, God commands us to count from the day after the weekly Sabbath falling within the Days of Unleavened Bread. When Passover occurs on a weekly Sabbath, the only weekly Sabbath occurring within Unleavened Bread is the last holy day. The wavesheaf offering occurs the next day - from which we begin the count. As the First of the Firstfruits, Jesus was waved Sunday morning after being resurrected Sabbath evening. The red-herring argument, focusing on Joshua 5:10-11, carelessly assuming that the wavesheaf was offered (with polluted, Canaanite grain), ignores the strict requirements of Exodus 23:14-16. No offerings of any kind could be made until specific conditions, outlined in Deuteronomy 12:1-13, were met, which did not happen until Joshua 18:1 (seven years after Joshua 5).

Show more Show less
Sermonette; May 18, 2002
When Pentecost Was Fully Come

In this sermonette on the 1974 doctrinal change on counting Pentecost, John Ritenbaugh explains the confusion of our previous understanding, resulting from the idiomatic use of counting "from" in English speaking and Hebrew speaking cultures. The qualifier "fully come" (Acts 2:1) which allegedly gave some reactionaries reason to cling to the old ways can be explained by a Greek grammar device (present tense articular infinitive) rendering the phrase — "when the Day of Pentecost was "running its course," "taking place" or "being fulfilled"—showing a contemporaneous aspect, not something that had been completed.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Mar 10, 2001
Wavesheaf Requirements and Joshua 5

Focusing upon a deceitful proclivity of human nature to find a loose brick to nullify a doctrine, John Ritenbaugh rebuts red herring arguments that the events of Joshua 5 provide an exception to the rule or pattern established in Leviticus 23:11. The entire contents of Leviticus 23 provides a chronological listing of the sabbaths (weekly and annual), and nothing in the subsequent chapters of the Bible alters or changes the times or dates these sabbaths are to be observed. Along with the obvious observation that nothing in the entire 5th chapter of Joshua remotely mentions anything about a wave sheaf offering, if the children of Israel, newly occupying the land, had used a foreigner's grain, it would have been a flagrant violation of Leviticus 22:25. The conditions for a wave sheaf offering were not right until Joshua 22, seven years after the Joshua 5 incident. The other "loose brick" in Luke 6:1 " the second sabbath after the first" is established on a spurious scripture.

Show more Show less
'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; December 2000
Countdown to Pentecost 2001

Pentecost in 2001 is a little different than in other years. The Sabbath during the Days of Unleavened Bread falls on the last day. How should we count to Pentecost on odd years like this? John Ritenbaugh explains the reasons for counting the same way as in all other years.

Show more Show less
Bible Study; May 1996
Holy Days: Pentecost

The late spring Feast of Pentecost shows the harvest of firstfruits, God's church. It is a continual reminder of our part in God's plan!

Show more Show less
Booklet; 1995
'After Three Days'

A scriptural explanation of the time of Christ's death, burial and resurrection, showing that He died on a Wednesday and rose from the dead on the Sabbath.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Apr 15, 1995
Christ's Death, Resurrection, and Ascension

In this sermon on the death, resurrection, and ascension of Christ, Richard Ritenbaugh, using three consecutive Psalms (22-24), affirms that Jesus Christ was the antitype, perfectly fulfilling the Old Testament types, slain as the Lamb of God on Passover, Nisan 14, resurrected with the cutting of the wavesheaf at the conclusion of the Sabbath, and ascended to His Father at the time of the waving of the sheaf.


Looking for scriptures? Go to Bible verses for: Sabbath within Days of Unleavened Bread



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

Looking for More?

Receive Biblical truth in your inbox—spam-free! This daily newsletter provides a starting point for personal study, and gives valuable insight into the verses that make up the Word of God. See what over 145,000 subscribers are already receiving.


 





 

Privacy Policy
Close
E-mail This Page