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Sermon; Aug 4, 2018
The Burden of Sin

Charles Whitaker, focusing upon the saccharine altar calls issued by evangelical preachers to "throw your sins upon Jesus," a rite generally accompanied by a hymn such as George Root's "Cast Thy Burden Upon the Lord," explains that these altar calls are based on a pack of lies. The bondage of our sin could be figuratively represented by the burdensome chain which burdened some convicts of the past. The Scriptures amply prove that Christ alone bears our sins and takes them from us; we have no power to cast our burdens upon Christ. Rather, our task is to humbly yield to His will, keeping His Commandments, and accepting His grace when God the Father calls. We do not "dump our sins on the cross"; we repent of them and then rip them out our lives with the help of God's Holy Spirit. God calls us—not the suave golden-throated evangelist. The altar call and the crucifix both perpetuate the falsehood that Christ is still hanging on the cross. Jesus Christ's sacrifice covered our sins; our obligation is to obey His Commandments and yield to His work of sanctification.



Ready Answer; May 2017
Who Fulfills the Azazel Goat— Satan or Christ? (Part Three)

The offering on the Day of Atonement is unique in that it is a singular offering in two parts, each goat representing a separate aspect of Christ's sacrifice. In Part Three, David Grabbe explains why the goat of departure cannot be connected to the binding of Satan (Revelation 20:1-3), as well as how Hebrews 9 and 10 clarify the Atonement ritual's meaning through the complete—and completed—sacrifice of Christ.



CGG Weekly; Mar 10, 2017
Pruning and Cleansing

Charles Whitaker:  In John 15:2, Christ describes two distinct actions on the part of the Father: "Every branch in Me that does not bear fruit He takes away; and every branch that bears fruit He prunes ...



Sermonette; Oct 8, 2016
The Vinedresser - Revisited

Clyde Finklea revisits the interpretation of John 15:2 , which reads in most translations, "every branch that does not bear fruit, He takes way." This is assumed by many to mean "get rid of." Dr. Bruce Wilkinson, in his book, The Secrets of the Vine, explains that "takes away" should be more properly rendered "take up," deriving from the tendency of new grape vines to bend down and become covered with dirt. Vineyard owners in northern California explained to Wilkinson that a branch is too valuable to simply discard, but would be washed off and lifted up, tied to a trellis to enable exposure to sunlight. If a vinedresser lifts up a vine, securing it to a trellis or pole, it is because it is fruitless. Once it begins to bear fruit, it is then pruned for the purpose of bearing more fruit. As God's called out ones, we need to be able to distinguish between punishment for wrong-doing and pruning for greater growth, something which Job's 'friends' had to learn the hard way. As products of God's workmanship, we endure His discipline, producing quality fruit to glorify Him.



CGG Weekly; Mar 30, 2007
The Vinedresser

Clyde Finklea:  During His Passover instructions to His disciples in the upper room, Jesus uses an illustration to explain how God works with us to produce fruit in our lives...