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Jesus Christ as Wavesheaf

Go to Bible verses for: Jesus Christ as Wavesheaf

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Sermon; May 20, 2018
Themes of Ruth (Part Three): Redemption

Richard Ritenbaugh points out that the theme of redemption occurs throughout the Book of Ruth. Just as justification and salvation are not one-time events but are continuous processes, redemption is also an ongoing process. Jesus redeemed us with His shed blood from the penalty of our sins, but He also works incessantly as our High Priest, continually redeeming us until we are ultimately resurrected as members of His family. Even though Christ has redeemed us, we foolishly slide back into this world's entanglements. The two loaves of the Pentecost offering, which represent the First Fruits, are made from finely beaten flour and baked at high heat, representing the many refining tests and trials we go through to achieve spiritual maturity during our grueling sanctification period. The burnt, sin, and peace offerings associated with the Pentecost offerings symbolize the high standard required to qualify as one of the 144,000. The death of Naomi's husband (Elimelech, meaning "God is King") foreshadows how coming out of the world and entry into God's Kingdom takes place through the death of God. Boaz, a type of Christ, redeems a foreigner, Ruth, who has totally committed to following God's purpose for her, forsaking suitors her own age, and accepting betrothal from someone old enough to be her father. Like Ruth, we also are foreigners to the God Family. Christ, because of His love for us, has protected us and showered us with affection, just as Boaz did for Ruth. Christ wants us to emulate the Proverbs 31 woman, whom Solomon undoubtedly recognized as his great grandmother Ruth.

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Sermon; Apr 6, 2018
Consequences of Resurrection and Ascension

Richard Ritenbaugh, observing that pagan fertility rites and sun worship have nothing to do with the resurrection or ascension of Christ, asserts that Christmas, Easter, as well as the concepts of "amazing grace," and "unmerited pardon" are far cries from the Bible's definition of Christianity. Because he sought to avoid the appearance of endorsing the syrupy cheap grace advanced by Protestant thinkers, Herbert W. Armstrong de-emphasized the birth, resurrection, and ascension of Christ. As a result, the Church came to lose some valuable insights about those events. Neither Christmas or Easter appear in the Feasts of the Lord (Leviticus 23), but we find plenty of emphasis on the resurrection and ascension of Christ in the Holy Days. The wave-sheaf offering, for example, appearing between Unleavened Bread and Pentecost and symbolizing the Father's acceptance of Christ as First of the First Fruits, provides the means for our ultimate acceptance as First Fruits as well. Christ's ascension enables Christ to serve before the Father as our High Priest, mediating between man and God. It also facilitates 1.) His gifting the Church for equipping the saints, 2.) His pouring out the Holy Spirit on us, 3.) His aiding us when we are tempted, 4.) His healing us when we are sick, 5.) His guarding us from the evil one and 5) His preparing a place for us in God's Kingdom. Realizing that the apostles wrote frequently about Christ's resurrection and ascension, we must be willing to share their perspective.

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Sermonette; Mar 24, 2018
The Spring Holy Days

Ryan McClure, acknowledging that we are about to enter another Spring holy day cycle, urges us to probe into the deeper meaning of these days more than we have previously, reminding us that God's wisdom is unsearchable. We discover that Jesus Christ's sacrifice was foreordained before the foundation of the world to permit the successful reproduction of the God-kind, fashioning mankind in His image. From the first blood-sign on the doorpost saving the first born of ancient Israel from physical death (signifying obedience to God's commands), Jesus Christ's blood sacrifice provides the means for us to be justified, beginning the lengthy sanctifying process through which we acquire the boldness to enter the sanctuary of God's throne room. The days of Unleavened Bread picture the putting out of sin as we leave Egypt (symbolic of our past slavery to sin). The 50-day trek toward Pentecost pictures our converted walk following Jesus Christ, receiving God's Holy Spirit to become one of the First-fruits, an heir to the Kingdom of God and a member of God's family. We should use this sacred time to dive deeper into things God has planned for us.

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Prophecy Watch; May 2010
The Harvesting of the Firstfruits

The church of God has long acknowledged the biblical analogy of a harvest representing the gathering and eventual resurrection of the saints. Bill Keesee speculates that we can perhaps expand our understanding of the harvest analogy to include other aspects of our preparation for God's Kingdom.

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Sermon; Jun 15, 2008
Boaz and Pentecost

Richard Ritenbaugh, pondering why some authors chose the enigmatic titles of their books, observes that the name of Boaz (a type of Christ) appears many times more than Ruth (a type of the church), indicating Christ's intensive work on behalf of the church, harvesting the firstfruits to the Lord. The whole period from the wavesheaf offering to the offering of the baked loaves constitutes God's harvesting of the firstfruits. It is our obligation to get in line to do our part, as Ruth diligently did her part. Ruth originally was a foreigner (a Moabitess) a type of worldly person outside the covenant, who nevertheless commits herself to Naomi (a type of Israel) and her God, and ultimately becomes redeemed by Boaz, a gracious provider, who instructs the reapers to leave Ruth a generous portion of grain as well as offering her protection and safety, admonishing her not to glean in another field, but to stay close to his women servants, keeping her eyes on the field, following the examples of the other servants, drinking only from what the young men have drawn. In addition to providing graciously, Boaz was a righteous judge, having gathered all the details of Ruth's virtuous and selfless life as he had gathered the grain, winnowing the chaff from the good kernels. After Boaz judged Ruth, he lovingly and lawfully redeemed her as Christ has redeemed His Church.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; January 2008
Pentecost Revisited (Part Two): Joshua 5

Correctly counting to Pentecost in years in which Passover falls on a weekly Sabbath is more than a matter of consistency. John Ritenbaugh explains that a far greater, more spiritual—and unfortunately, often overlooked—factor in the wavesheaf offering concerns a subject God considers highly important: holiness.

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Article; November 2007
Pentecost Revisited: Counting Consistently

This year, 2008, is another one in which Passover falls on a weekly Sabbath, making the count to Pentecost more complex. John Ritenbaugh, however, argues that the count need not be done differently in these particular years. All we need to do is to apply God's command consistently.

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Sermon; Feb 26, 2005
Pentecost, Consistency, and Honesty

John Ritenbaugh, clearing up the needless confusion about the proper day to begin counting to Pentecost, examines the basic passages on it. Because Pentecost does not have a specific date, God commands us to count from the day after the weekly Sabbath falling within the Days of Unleavened Bread. When Passover occurs on a weekly Sabbath, the only weekly Sabbath occurring within Unleavened Bread is the last holy day. The wavesheaf offering occurs the next day - from which we begin the count. As the First of the Firstfruits, Jesus was waved Sunday morning after being resurrected Sabbath evening. The red-herring argument, focusing on Joshua 5:10-11, carelessly assuming that the wavesheaf was offered (with polluted, Canaanite grain), ignores the strict requirements of Exodus 23:14-16. No offerings of any kind could be made until specific conditions, outlined in Deuteronomy 12:1-13, were met, which did not happen until Joshua 18:1 (seven years after Joshua 5).

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; December 2000
Countdown to Pentecost 2001

Pentecost in 2001 is a little different than in other years. The Sabbath during the Days of Unleavened Bread falls on the last day. How should we count to Pentecost on odd years like this? John Ritenbaugh explains the reasons for counting the same way as in all other years.

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Bible Study; May 1996
Holy Days: Pentecost

The late spring Feast of Pentecost shows the harvest of firstfruits, God's church. It is a continual reminder of our part in God's plan!

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Sermon/Bible Study; Aug 4, 1987
John (Part 28)

John Ritenbaugh explains that Jesus' caution to Mary in John 20:17, "Don't touch me," is more accurately translated "Don't cling to me." Either translation does not contradict the First Fruits symbolism. (After all, the Levitical Priests had to "touch" the grain in order to offer it.) Also the charge Jesus gave to the disciples in John 20:23 was not to "forgive sin" but only to discern the fruits of repentance, consistent with the binding and loosing authority of Levitical Priests, applying God's law. Having the "Mind of Christ" gives the New Testament ministry the ability to discern the fruits of repentance. The problem with Thomas was more his tendency to be a loner, having cutting himself from the fellowship of his brothers, than his doubting. Thomas's insistence upon touching refutes the Gnostic's claim that Jesus did not have corporeal substance. Not only does the book of John (written in 96AD) provides a plethora of signs corroborating Jesus Christ's authenticity, but also shows a pattern to actively live as God would live if He were a man, with the effect of building and sustaining faith. The epilogue (chapter 21) seemed to be added to counteract the assumption that John would live until Christ's second coming, as well as confuting the Gnostics' claim that Jesus did not have physical substance. The conclusion describes the disciples' bewildered reaction to their resurrected teacher. In this incident, Jesus formally, by using expressions identifying different levels of love, affirms the intense responsibility and difficulty of the commission given to Peter.


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