Presumption and Divine Justice (Part Two)

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

The Bible reveals a definite pattern of God's displeasure with resumption. God's justice always aligns with His righteousness; we should be grateful for His mercy.


Presumptuousness

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Individuals arrogating to themselves the authority to change doctrine are on extremely dangerous ground, presumptuously setting up idols in place of God.


Presumption and Divine Justice

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Orthodoxy in virtually every aspect of life has been discarded, indicating how perverse human nature is in its determination to rebel against God.


Christmas, Syncretism, and Presumption

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Many think keeping Christmas is fine, yet God never tells us to celebrate His Son's birth. Celebrating such an obvious mix of paganism s presumptuous.


Living by Faith and God's Justice

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Among the spiritual realities that a faithful Christian must understand is God's sense of justice. The deaths of Nadab and Abihu are a case in point.


God Will Understand

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

God pays attention to the small things we may excuse in ourselves, sins we commit in weakness. God's patience does not constitute approval of our sin.


Living By Faith: God's Justice

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

In order to live by faith, we must understand God's sovereignty, God's character, and God's justice, realizing that we do not see the entire picture.


God's Sense of Justice

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

God is absolutely justified in what He decides regarding the judgment and punishment of us all. However, He is merciful and always rewards righteousness.


A Calendar Summary

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cautioning against the danger of presumption, warns against assigning biblical types (like Joshua and Zerubbabel) to any contemporary ministers, pointing out that, except for a few superficial similarities, there are not enough parallels or grounds of comparison to make such an inferential leap. Two major …