A Contrast of Kings

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting on our future roles as kings and priests, warns us that we currently have no preparation, but God desires that we will be kings and priests. He desires to fill thousands of leadership positions in the Millennium. In the law of first mention, the theme of king is significant, pertaining to realm. …


Principled Living (Part Seven): Enduring to the End

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Like a marathoner or a soldier fighting a battle, we are admonished to endure to the end, standing firm, holding our ground, and resisting assaults.


Perfect, Gentle Courtesy (Part 2)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Good manners are not just an accomplishment, but a duty that everyone must practice in order for society to move smoothly.


Facing Times of Stress: Hopeless Regrets

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

It sometimes appears that people outside the church have fewer problems and anxieties, having been spared Satan's onslaught of temptation and deception.


Joshua and the Gibeonites (Part Three)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

We must be very careful about ascribing human behavior—and especially human sin—to God, concluding that it must be God's will, or it would be different.


Facing Times of Stress: Fear of the Future

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Paul's admonition to Timothy to stir up God's Holy Spirit applies just as much today when we sometimes become blindsided by fears about the future.


Preventing Deception

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Religious hucksters use the bait of self-gratification, selling non-essential or even heretical ideas. The elect resist deception by knowing the real article.


Matthew (Part Five)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh


Joshua and the Gibeonites

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

The Gibeonites' pretense of coming from a distant land resulted in their slavery. Yet, through their influence, they contributed to Israel's destruction.


The Sacrifices of Leviticus (Part 3)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Various animals were used in the burnt offering—bullocks, lambs, doves, and goats. Each depicts some characteristic of Jesus that we must emulate as we serve God.


Offerings (Part Two)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh


What's the Endgame?

Commentary by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Leaders will use crises to consolidate their power and further their agenda. The real devastation may occur after the coronavirus runs its course.


Hospitality

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Reflecting on the Homeric concept of xenia (a reciprocal hospitality toward strangers, leading to lifelong bonds), Richard Ritenbaugh maintains that godly hospitality goes far beyond this outstanding Greek characteristic. When Abraham, Lot, Gideon, and Samson's parents entertained angels, the term philoxenia (love or hospitality …