Habakkuk

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Habakkuk learns to look, watch, wait, then respond, realizing that God is sovereign and will rectify all the injustices in His own time.


Habakkuk: A Prophet of Faith (Part One)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, focusing on the Prophet Habakkuk, whose name means "one who embraces" or "one who clings," suggests that a major theme of the Book of Habakkuk is the importance of clinging to God regardless of the vicissitudes of life. Habakkuk's prophecy seems to be up-to-date when describing God's called …


Meet the Minor Prophets (Part Three)

'Prophecy Watch' by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

As witnesses to the decline and fall of Israel and Judah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, and Haggai report the conditions that led to their defeat and captivity.


Lamentations (Part One)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The book's five acrostic songs (chapters) answer the question, 'Why did this happen?' God brought the punishment on Judah because of gross and sustained sin.


The Doctrine of Israel (Part Five): A Remnant of Judah

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Despite her former relationship with God, absolutely no nation could ever out-sin Judah, even though God had given her multiple warnings to repent.


Lamentations (Part Two)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, creating a hypothetical scenario in which God sends the Russians- to devastate America and reduce it to a vassal state, suggests that such a catastrophe would resemble the conditions described by the Book of Lamentations. The Scriptures describe the Chaldeans as a bitter and hasty nation, ruthless and …


Habakkuk: A Prophet of Faith (Part Four)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

We may find God's means of correction discouraging, but when we place His actions in context with His overall plan, we can find peace in God's sovereignty.


Servant of God, Act One: Going Around, Coming Around

Article by Charles Whitaker

A little-known character from the book of Jeremiah shares the stage with more well-known figures and teaches them a lesson we can learn from today.


Faith (Part Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Faithfulness in a person ultimately rests on his or her trust in God, and if a person is going to be faithful, its because he or she believes what God says.


The Beast and Babylon (Part Two)

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Currently, Europe is not looking very Beastly. Babylon is the world's anti-God system, and Roman institutions inspire Israelite culture even today.


Habakkuk: A Prophet of Faith (Part Three)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Habakkuk was frustrated that God would use an evil people to punish Israel, yet he resolved to cease fretting and to become a responsible watcher.


Habakkuk: A Prophet of Faith (Part Two)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

All of God's people should be watchmen like Habakkuk, living continually by faith, discerning, listening to, and responding to God's instructions.


The Doctrine of Israel (Part One): Origins

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Because Abraham trusted God, his descendants have received unprecedented blessings. If the Israelites would have kept God's law, they would have served as a model.


Faith and the Calendar (Part One)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh takes issue with those who feel that the perennial calendar controversy was never understood, investigated or resolved by Herbert Armstrong. After a lengthy study in the 1940s, he concluded: (1) there are not enough rules in the Bible to establish a calendar. (2) God had given no authority to anyone outside the …


The Book of Daniel (Part Two)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

The circumstances surrounding Nebuchadnezzar's dream set the stage for God's revelation of His power, plan, and prophetic intentions (through His servants).


Can God Look on Sin?

Sermonette by Ryan McClure

Many believe that God is unable to look on sin, yet many scriptures show that God's eyes run to and fro through the earth, observing the evil and the good.


Abraham (Part Three)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Abraham did not come from a primitive, but a highly advanced civilization, having huge multi-storied dwellings with running water and indoor bathrooms.


Abraham (Part One)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Abraham came from a civilization in Mesopotamia that was highly advanced in science, including calculus and chemistry, and having indoor running water.