The Doctrine of Israel (Part Five): A Remnant of Judah

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Despite her former relationship with God, absolutely no nation could ever out-sin Judah, even though God had given her multiple warnings to repent.


Lamentations (Part One)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The book's five acrostic songs (chapters) answer the question, 'Why did this happen?' God brought the punishment on Judah because of gross and sustained sin.


Lamentations (Part Three)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Personified Jerusalem, whom God depicts as a grieving widow, blames others for her troubles while overlooking her own sins as the real cause of her sorrow.


Lamentations (Part Four)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

In Lamentations 2, Lady Jerusalem sidesteps godly repentance, opting instead for self-centered recrimination against Almighty God.


Psalms: Book Three (Part One)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Book Three of the Psalms deals with the somber theme of judgment on a people who have rejected their God and have produced much rotten spiritual fruit.


Meet the Minor Prophets (Part Three)

'Prophecy Watch' by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

As witnesses to the decline and fall of Israel and Judah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, and Haggai report the conditions that led to their defeat and captivity.


Lamentations (Part Two)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The Lamentations show poignant before-and-after vignettes of formerly happy times contrasted with the horror of the present as God punishes Judah.


Lamentations (Part Two; 1989)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh contends that while Scripture does allow for individuals to share their faults with one another for encouragement and brotherly advice, no man has the power to forgive sins or grant absolution, a prerogative retained by Christ and God the Father alone. Trusting human allies rather than God to also seems to be a …


Lamentations (Part Eight)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

As we approach the coming self-examination prior to Passover, we can apply six significant lessons taught to ancient Israel through the book of Lamentations.


How to Survive Exile

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, addressing our current scattered state as a form of exile, asserts that exile has been a form of punishment God has used from the very beginning, with our original parents through the patriarchs, through the ancient kingdoms of Israel and Judah, right up to the present time. God exiles to punish for sin, …


The Book of Joel (Part One)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

When Joel describes the devastating locust plagues, instead of promising a silver lining on a very black cloud, he says things are going to get intensely worse.


Fully Accepting God's Sovereignty (Part One)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We are mandated to live by faith, being given trials of faith in order to chisel our character. We must totally and unreservedly accept God's sovereignty.


Sky Like Iron, Earth Like Bronze

'Prophecy Watch' by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Just about half of the continental United States suffers under severe drought conditions. And lack of water is not the only thing we need to worry about.


Zephaniah (Part Two): God's Wrath on the Whole World

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Even though the Gentiles will be punished, only Israelites had a special relationship with God, and consequently were more accountable for their failure.


Manasseh

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Even though Manasseh was absolutely the worst king ever to lead Judah, Manasseh finally got the message that God only is God, and sincerely repented.


Zephaniah (Part Three): Quick Destruction, Eternal Restoration

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Zephaniah has messages for the remnant of physical Israel, the house of David, and for the faithful remnant from the Israel of God.


Zephaniah (Part One): The Day of the Lord Is Near!

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Zephaniah's prophecy is sharply focused on Judah and Jerusalem because they should have known better. They are ordered to keep silent and consider their sins.