The Glory of God (Part 1): The Shekinah

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The Shekinah, the pillar of cloud and fire, depicts God's visible presence and protection. Yet His glory is manifested in many other ways as well.


Glory and Oneness

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

In Christ's Passover prayer, He states that the glory the Father had given Him had also been given to the disciples. Christ's glory is the key to being one.


Of Snowflakes and Suns and Glory

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Charles Whitaker

Charles Whitaker, reflecting on the first question in the Westminster Catechism, 'What is man's purpose?" says this catechism suggests that man's greatest purpose is to glorify God. Glory enriches a person's well-being. After Moses received the Ten Commandments, his skin had a special iridescence, reflecting the glory of …


Radiating the Glory of God

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Mark Schindler

We have been allowed the privilege of knowing God now. We need to radiate the glory of God as Moses radiated the glory of God by having been in His presence.


The Glory of God (Part 2): In Christ

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

When we (following Jesus' example) display the way of God in our lives, bearing His name, and keeping His commandments, God's glory radiates in our lives.


The Glory of God (Part 3): From Glory to Glory

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

We must not limit God's glory to something physical like fire or cloud, but rather recognize God's glory as radiating from His character, which we can share.


Assurance (Part Three): Glory and Hope

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, reiterating that Romans 8 provides assurance that we are of God, asks us to consider that the sufferings we go through now are miniscule compared to the glory which we will later receive, completely eclipsing the glory of Adam and Eve before their fall. Our suffering is temporal, fleeting, and momentary, as …


In The Likeness of Men!

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Jesus was subjected to the same experiences as the rest of us, having the appearance, experiences, the capability of receiving injury and suffering temptation.


Fully Man and Fully God?

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Jesus Christ is often misunderstood. The phrase 'fully man and fully God' does not have biblical support; Christ's real nature is much more meaningful.


We Shall Be God

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

Though it may sound pretentious or even blasphemous, God's Word shows that we will become literal offspring of the Eternal God, sharing His name and nature.


Seeking God (Part One): Our Biggest Problem

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

After making the covenant with God, how does a person avoid backsliding? The answer lies in seeking God, which involves much more than commonly thought.


Fully Man and Fully God? (2001)

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

The Bible records that Jesus of Nazareth's Father was God and His mother was Mary, a human. What, then, was His nature? Was He a man? Was He divine?


The End

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, referring to the caption, "The End," suggests that "The End" may also fill our minds with prophetic symbolism at the end of the age. Noah's flood was an end, the temple's destruction was an end, Christ's second coming will be an end, and the Last Great Day will be an end as well as a …


John (Part 26)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

While the other accounts of Jesus' trial and crucifixion seem to show passivity, John shows Jesus totally in charge, purposefully and courageously moving.


God, the Church's Greatest Problem

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

After our calling, we must seek God and His way, for our conduct is motivated by our concept of God. Coming to know God is the church's biggest problem.


The Priesthood of God (Part Six)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing upon I Peter 1:13-16, reiterates that holiness must be an indispensible characteristic of the called-out priesthood. This mandate markedly influences our relationships, making us servants to one another as a band of brothers and subject to God, developing respect and affection for the brotherhood. We …


Where is Beauty?

Sermonette by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on the aphorism, "beauty is in the eye of the beholder," reminds us that God alone is the author of beauty, creating the multiple sense modalities (sight, sound, touch, smell and taste) and has created nothing ugly, including sunsets, landscapes, differing flora and fauna, and even facial …