Themes of Ruth (Part Two): God's Providence

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

As we count the 50 days toward Pentecost, we should consider the events of our lives, coming to understand that they reveal God's on-going maintenance.


God the Father (Part 1)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

Jesus reveals that the Father has always had supreme authority, and that He and His Father are absolutely at one in purpose. We must conform to their image.


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Ten): Paradox

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Ecclesiastes 7 contains a paradox: wickedness appears to be rewarded and righteousness seems to bring trouble. We must be careful in how we respond to this.


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Eleven): Paradox, Continued

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Hard trials are not punishments from God for unrighteousness but tests of faith in which He is intimately involved to prepare us for the world to come.


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Twelve): Paradox, Conclusion

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

There is a danger that arises when the righteous suffer and the wicked prosper: trying to put God under obligation to bless us through becoming 'super-righteous'.


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Trials are a means to produce spiritual growth, unless we resort to super-righteousness, straining to please God by exalting our works.


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The paradox of Ecclesiastes 7 shows an unrighteous man flourishing and a righteous man suffering. The solution to this conundrum is found in Psalm 73.


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Three)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing in on Psalm 73:1-9, describing the despair of someone seeing the wicked prosper while the righteous suffer, affirms that it is a delusion that people in the world are leading comfortable lives. Christian living, while not comfortable, has a restorative faith in God. If our focus is on comfort, we cannot …


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Seven)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting that Ecclesiastes 7 contains some of the most significant concepts applicable to the Christian religion, identifies them as follows: (1) A good name or reputation (based on trust, responsibility, or dependability) is better than gold and silver. (2) We should prepare for our eventual death, faithfully …


What 'The Bible and Its Influence' Will Teach

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

The liberal media and National Education Association strive to banish every hint of Christianity from public school. Surprisingly, one 'Bible class' is allowed.


Malachi's Appeal to Backsliders (Part Three)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

We must be careful when we ask for justice, for our request might come back to bite us. Those begging for justice will indeed get what they ask for.


Another Look at the Book of Job

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

Where did Job's righteousness come from? Was his character a product of evolution, or was it intelligently formed out of nothingness like the rest of creation?


Themes of Ruth (Part One): Naomi

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Naomi's attractive personality, selflessness, godly conviction and common sense characterize her relationship with her Gentile daughters-in-law.


Maintaining Good Health (Part 6)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reveals that the reason Jacob succeeded and Esau failed had nothing to do with personality, but Jacob was elected from the womb (Romans 9:7-11). God gave Jacob the edge. Likewise, we can do nothing to gain the favor of God before our calling, but we are empowered by God to carry out a particular part of His plan …


The Father-Son Relationship (Part Five)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Although Christ is not the Absolute Deity, He is nevertheless the complement of the Father. He had a pre-existence as the God of the Old Testament.


Self-Government and Responsibility (Part Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Our experiences prepare us to be a better judge or king. Though we may exercise righteous judgment, we dare not pass judgment nor justify sin in ourselves.