Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Ten): Paradox

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Ecclesiastes 7 contains a paradox: wickedness appears to be rewarded and righteousness seems to bring trouble. We must be careful in how we respond to this.


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Eleven): Paradox, Continued

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Hard trials are not punishments from God for unrighteousness but tests of faith in which He is intimately involved to prepare us for the world to come.


Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Twelve): Paradox, Conclusion

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

There is a danger that arises when the righteous suffer and the wicked prosper: trying to put God under obligation to bless us through becoming 'super-righteous'.


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Trials are a means to produce spiritual growth, unless we resort to super-righteousness, straining to please God by exalting our works.


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-One)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, continuing his exposition on Ecclesiastes, focuses on three interrelated terms: paradox (something contrary to expectation), conundrum (a riddle), and wisdom (skill in arts, such as Bezalel and Oholiab who were gifted in a specific skill—or spiritual insight). We are called into the body of Christ gifted …


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The paradox of Ecclesiastes 7 shows an unrighteous man flourishing and a righteous man suffering. The solution to this conundrum is found in Psalm 73.


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Three)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing in on Psalm 73:1-9, describing the despair of someone seeing the wicked prosper while the righteous suffer, affirms that it is a delusion that people in the world are leading comfortable lives. Christian living, while not comfortable, has a restorative faith in God. If our focus is on comfort, we cannot …


Words Without Knowledge

Sermonette by Levi W. Graham

Elihu respectfully admonished Job for presumptuously taking God to task for his affliction, instructing Job that his words were without wisdom and insight


Joshua and the Gibeonites

Sermonette by David C. Grabbe

The Gibeonites' pretense of coming from a distant land resulted in their slavery. Yet, through their influence, they contributed to Israel's destruction.


Joshua and the Gibeonites (Part Two)

CGG Weekly by David C. Grabbe

The Gibeonites' subterfuge succeeded because Israel's leaders, including Joshua, failed to check in with God, and in time, that failure cost them dearly.