Reach for the Goal

Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

Similar to the way people pull together in times of crisis, we must also have a goal, a vision of the finish line, in order to overcome and grow.


Focus Is The Key

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, citing the findings of Dave Crenshaw, a business chaos crusher, alerts us that the average worker is interrupted 15 times per hour, many of which are self-inflicted, suggesting that these interruptions resemble small cuts which drain the life blood out of productivity. One of the most deceptively innocent, but …


One Answer to Distractions

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, quoting from efficiency expert or "business chaos crusher" Dave Crenshaw, urges that distractions and interruptions caused by phone, e-mail, computers, or texting, are detrimental to productivity and to the operating a business at a profit. The average worker is interrupted 15 times per hour, 120 times …


Rivet Your Eyes on the Destination

Article by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

By recounting a personal experience, John Reid reveals a valuable lesson about keeping our eyes focused on our goal, the Kingdom. Overconcern with the around-and-about tends to distracts us, and before we know it we are off course. Our preparation for God's Kingdom depends on our focus!


The Formula for Overcoming

Article by David F. Maas

Want an easy, proven formula for getting rid of sin and growing in God's character? Dr. David Maas can provide it!


Vision (Part One)

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

'I Dreamed a Dream' from Les Miserables is a poignant reminder of the personal devastation that comes from not committing to a long-term vision of a good life.


Our Final Performance Review

Sermonette by Bill Onisick

Without well-defined plans, projects become quickly derailed. Both time and energy are wasted in the absence of carefully established goals.


The Overcoming Skill

Sermonette by Bill Onisick

With God's Spirit, we can develop the overcoming skill, using self-control to make firm commitments to our small, yet progressively significant choices.


Vision (Part Two)

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

We must protect ourselves from toxic information overload by keeping the vision of our calling in front of us, living for the future. We cannot be distracted.


Planning and Preparation (Part Two)

CGG Weekly by Mike Ford (1955-2021)

Poor planning and preparation, and no prayer, leads to a poor performance.


Simplify Your Life!

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

We waste a lot of it on foolish pursuits, procrastination and distractions. Getting control of our time is foundational for seeking God's Kingdom.


Seeing Sanctification as an Exciting Adventure

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by David F. Maas

The events in today's news can seem overwhelming, but there are strategies to turn the sanctification process into an exciting adventure.


Indistractable

Commentary by Bill Onisick

Social media, text messages, e-mails, websites and blogs are competing for our time, eroding our attention spans and exhausting our ability to concentrate.


Where Is Your Heart?

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

What is truly important to us? What do we really need versus what do we merely want? Where are our hearts?


Sanctification and the Teens

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Young people in the church must realize that they are not invincible. Not only is God's law no respecter of persons, but also sanctification can be lost.


Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Profit from life is produced by work, requiring sacrifices of time and energy. We have been created for the very purpose of doing good works.


Resistance (Part Three): Persistence

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

The elite athlete is the one with the gritty persistence and tenacity to fight on regardless of the obstacles, wanting nothing to do with mediocrity.


Matthew (Part Twenty-Four)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that Matthew 18 describes the essence of personal relationships within the church. Seven basic characteristics are emphasized, including having a childlike humble attitude, setting a proper example, exercising self-denial, individual care, using tact in correcting a person, practicing fellowship and …


The Seven Laws of Success

Herbert W. Armstrong Booklet

WHY are only the very few—women as well as men—successful in life? Just what is success? Here is the surprising answer to life's most difficult problem.


Sanctification, Teens, and Self-Control

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Young people are responsible for the spiritual knowledge that they have learned from their parents, as well as the custodianship of spiritual blessings.