Reacting to Criticism

Commentary by Martin G. Collins

All have been guilty of malicious gossip; consequently, they should not become offended when they hear gossip about themselves (Ecclesiastes 7:21).


Criticism: The Foolish Habit

CGG Weekly by Clyde Finklea

Instead of criticizing others, we need to engage in some honest self-criticism. We have plenty of faults of our own; there is no need to look for them in others.


Using Righteous Judgment

Sermon by Kim Myers

When we minimize sin, we become displeasing to God. God expects His people to confront brothers and sisters in Christ gently, without becoming judgmental.


Mercy: The Better Option

'Ready Answer' by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

It is easy to fall into the traps of judgmentalism, gossip, and unforgiveness. We must overcome our natural reactions and use forbearance in our relationships.


Judgment, Tolerance, and Correction

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

A common mantra, even among Christians, is 'You shouldn't judge.' Is this a right concept? Here is the problem, and how righteous judgment should be done.


Judging in the Church

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Human nature is strongly competitive and full of pride, making judgment inherently problematic. Nevertheless, God wants us to learn to judge with equity.


Using Our Spiritual Vocabulary

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

In the same way that we use only a small fraction of our vocabulary, because we are human, we use only a small fraction of what we have learned from God's Word.


Dealing With a Sinning Brother

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Disfellowshiping is only used for the most extreme cases in which the safety of the congregation is threatened. Lesser offenses require more sensitivity.


The Prisoner

'Ready Answer' by Austin Del Castillo

We tend to work at cross-purposes to God, imprisoning ourselves and others in our adversarial relationships. The key to our cell is true forgiveness.


Spotting False Teachers

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

True shepherds have genuine concern for the flock, as opposed to hirelings who only devour or take advantage of the flock.