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Clothing, Symbol of

Go to Bible verses for: Clothing, Symbol of

Clothing, Wineskins, and Wine

'Ready Answer' by David C. Grabbe

The Parable of the Cloth and the Wineskins concludes a much longer narrative. The context and reveals deeper meanings and applications of the parable.

Resolutions: Man's and God's

'Ready Answer' by Ronny H. Graham

With the new year invariably come New Year's resolutions—and days or weeks later, a great deal of failure in keeping them! The idea of making resolutions to improve oneself is commendable, but we should carefully consider the kind of resolutions we m. . .

Parable of the Marriage Feast

Bible Study by Martin G. Collins

Jesus exposes the Jews' rejection of the gospel using the illustration of a king sending invitations to a wedding celebration. Though God is shown to be merciful and just, the invitees' character is revealed to be wanting.

Knowing God: Formality and Customs (Part 5)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh debunks the foolish notion that it does not matter what we wear if our heart is right on the inside. Our clothing as well as our outward conduct must match what is going on in our inner heart or being. Our clothing, often symbolizing righte. . .

Many Are Called, But Few Are Chosen (Part Nine)

Sermon by Martin G. Collins

The loyalty of the Laodiceans did not extend far beyond loyalty to self. Loyalty and friendship are inextricably bound together.

Modesty (Part 1): Moderation and Propriety

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Martin G. Collins

We must avoid the world's extremes and sensual excesses in matters of dress and fashion, adopting instead humility, chastity, decency, morality, and self control.

The Priesthood of God (Part 6)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing upon I Peter 1:13-16, reiterates that holiness must be an indispensible characteristic of the called-out priesthood. This mandate markedly influences our relationships, making us servants to one another as a band of brothers and s. . .

The Priesthood of God (Part 10) Conclusion

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

As future priests, we are going to be given rigorous, hands-on jobs to teach people righteousness and holiness, distinguishing between the sacred and profane.

Many Are Called, Few Are Chosen

'Ready Answer' by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

God's calling and predestination can be confusing, especially the verse that 'many are called, but few are chosen'. Why does God not just choose everyone?

A Culture in Freefall

CGG Weekly by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Not too long ago, Americans could sneer across the Atlantic at the abysmal state of European moral standards. ...

Matthew (Part 28)

Sermon/Bible Study by John W. Ritenbaugh

When God gives a responsibility, He gives all the tools to carry it out and the freedom to decide how to do it. He wants to see how we do with what He gives.

Knowing God: Formality and Customs (Part 4)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing upon the redemptive process, indicates that redemption obligates us to glorify God in our bodies and our spirit. Spiritually, we are literally owned by Christ and are duty bound to do what He asks. Hair length and clothing are out. . .

The Nature of God: Elohim

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Understanding Elohim teaches us about the nature of God and where our lives are headed. Elohim refers to a plural family unit in the process of expanding.

Protecting the Vulnerable

Sermonette by Ted E. Bowling

Ted Bowling, focusing on Deuteronomy 21:10-14, a passage giving instructions for the treatment of female prisoners-of-war, contends that, far from being a blatant example of sexual exploitation (as some 'progressives' have characterized it), this passage d. . .

The Priesthood of God (Part 7)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing Revelation 15:3-4, focuses on God's absolute holiness, demanding total veneration, drawing a clear and logical connection between goodness and holiness. God demands that we align ourselves with His holiness, separating ourselves from. . .

Parable of the Treasure

Bible Study by Martin G. Collins

Jesus' Parable of the Treasure in Matthew 6:19-21 is designed to get us to evaluate the relative values of material wealth and "treasures in heaven." Martin Collins expands on the metaphors of moths, rust, and thieves.

Faith and the Christian Fight (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The Bible abounds in metaphors of warfare, indicating that the Christian's walk will be characterized by stress, sacrifice, and deprivation in building faith.

Knowing God: Formality and Customs (Part 6)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh warns that human nature is hostile to change, even when it is confirmed to be in the wrong. In the matter of godly standards for dress (as in any other aspect of God's teaching), we must adopt the humble, childlike, sincere, unassuming, unp. . .

Laodiceanism

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Our love for beauty must be coupled with love for righteousness and holiness. Our relationship with Christ must take central place in our lives, displacing all else.

Leadership and the Covenants (Part Seven)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

All of the sufferings in the present had their origin in the Garden of Eden when our parents sinned, seemingly in secret. The effects of sins radiate outward.

Purpose-Driven Churches (Part 5)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Purpose-driven churches experience exponential growth through tolerating any belief. These churches would sacrifice any doctrine if it stands in the way of growth.


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