Sin
Sin

Share this on FacebookGoogle+RedditEmailPrinter version

Elisha

Go to Bible verses for: Elisha

Show more Show less
Sermon; Oct 10, 2017
The Failure of Miracles to Produce Righteousness

Martin Collins asserts that miracles and signs from God, while certainly generating awe and fear, seldom lead to righteousness, but more likely to continued rebellion. Jesus points out that only an adulterous generation seeks after miracles and signs. No greater period of miracles took place in history than at the time of the Exodus, including the plagues of Egypt, the parting of the Red Sea, and the giving of the Law at Mount Sinai. Yet, the stiff-necked Israelites rebelled against God on ten separate occasions. The longest period of growth and stability in Israel occurred under David's and Solomon's reigns, a period attended by no miracles. Elijah and Elisha performed godly miracles during a massive apostasy. John the Baptist, proclaimed by Jesus as the greatest of men, performed no miracles whatsoever. The miracles and signs Jesus performed were received with awe, but also with much ridicule and scoffing from the religious leaders. Axiomatically, the spiritually weak need miracles; the more spiritually mature one becomes, the fewer signs and wonders he needs to sustain faith. God blessed the Corinthian congregation with spiritual gifts (of discerning prophecy, speaking in tongues, healing, etc.), but the vanity which these gifts produced led to party-spirit and jealousy. In the future, the False Prophet and Beast will lead many astray by miracles and signs, deceiving most of the world. As God's called-out ones, walking humbly with God should displace any desperate need for signs and wonders.

Show more Show less
CGG Weekly; Feb 5, 2016
Elisha and the Double Portion

Richard T. Ritenbaugh:  Most of us, when we begin a new job or a new project, want to know all we can about it. We want to be ready to take it on and complete it to the best of our abilities. ...

Show more Show less
Sermonette; May 16, 2015
Ping

Ted Bowling, acknowledging that faith is a foundation of our assurance in the reality of God, uses a submarine analogy with its sonar equipment to illustrate faith. The crew of the submarine must rely on the ping of a sonar signal to keep from crashing into underwater cliffs, trusting in a power they cannot see. God has given to us spiritual sonar to help us to navigate in uncharted venues. If we rely on God, He will make our ways straight. As we pray, study, and meditate, we sharpen our spiritual sonar, seeing that God is active in our lives, helping us to navigate through Satan's demonic world, fraught with multiple distractions. God alone knows what trials we go through and what they will accomplish. Like Elisha's servant had to learn, the forces with us are more than are with the enemy. Angelic forces are available to all of God's called-out ones. Without the spiritual sonar of faith, supplied by God's Holy Spirit, we will not be able to see God working in our lives.

Show more Show less
Sermonette; Apr 25, 2015
Hair Care?

Ronny Graham, reflecting on his experience in finding a new barber, observed the wide kaleidoscopic spectrum of color for women's hairdos, from pink to green to red, white, and blue, as well as long hair on men, dreadlocks, multi-varieties of beards, or shaving the head totally bald. To be well-groomed almost makes one stick out like a sore thumb. During the 1960's, the Hippie movement intended long hair to be the quintessential symbol for rebellion against society. The hippie rock musical Hair, ostensibly a political statement condemning the Viet Nam War, glorified rebellion against morality, displaying 'free love,' sexual 'freedom,' profanity, and drugs, ushering in the Age of Aquarius. Experimentation with hair has always been associated with rebellion in the world's cultures. David's son Absalom's rebellion seemed to be inextricably tied to his vanity over his long hair. Samson, having taken the Nazarite vow not to cut his hair, became a prime target for Israel's enemies who desired to know the secret of his strength. Shaving hair to the skin was considered a symbol of extreme humiliation. In Leviticus 19:27, men were advised not to shave the sides of their heads or shave the corners of their beards, mimicking the pagan Egyptian culture. When young hoodlums mocked the prophet Elisha, calling him "old baldy," they were mauled to death by bears. Paul instructs men that having long hair is a shame to them, even though they consider it a statement of self-expression. Paul also instructs women that obsessing about hair could indicate excessive worldly mindedness. God expects both men and women to exercise modesty and common sense in their tonsorial management.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Jul 19, 2014
Seeking God in the Mundane

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the holiness movement of the 19th century which led to the emergence of Pentecostal and charismatic congregations, persuasions which have engulfed one-fourth of the entirety of Christian denominations and 8% of the world's population, warns that "Pentecostalism," with its emphasis on the emotions, the intuitive, the sensational as being more important than the intellectual, meditative, and reflective, carries some serious dangers to a true believer. When examining the early ministry of the prophet Elijah, it seems that he had succumbed to a kind of emotional, self-centered, charismatic "Pentecostal" mindset, petulantly assuming God would provide a cornucopia of miracles for him. Elijah really felt on top of his game after God consumed his sacrifice in the contest with the prophets of Baal, indicating (to Elijah) that God would intervene at his will and desire. Elijah needed to learn that God was in charge of the relationship, not the other way around. Our forebears on the Sinai were stiff-necked, imposing their will on God, practicing wrong-doing to see if God were watching, acting carelessly (presumptuously), assuming God was duty-bound to take care of them, all the while twisting God's word to suit their plans. Elijah evidently was up-ended by Jezebel's threatening response, and felt a compulsion to run for his life, drifting ultimately into a near-catatonic depression, evidently indifferent to God's intervention and protection. God is more interested in quietness and meekness than in bombastic displays of power.

Show more Show less
Sermon; May 17, 2014
How God Deals With Conscience (Part Two)

Martin Collins, reflecting on the reaction of Joseph's brothers on the binding of Simeon and the returning of their money mentioned in Genesis 42, claims this was the first time in their lives these 'raised in the church kids' had ever seriously acknowledged the working of God in their lives. God had softened their hardness of heart while showing grace. The proclivity of the brothers to lie and deceive had not yet been eradicated, but God continued to turn up the pressure in order to bring them to full repentance. As confession and repentance is attained and the guilty conscience is cleansed, the heart becomes other-centered rather than self- centered. In our lives, we also have guilty consciences like Joseph's brothers and self-pity like our father Jacob (or later by Elijah fearing Jezebel), but we can have major breakthroughs in our lives if we acknowledge God in our lives as Jacob did at Bethel and Elisha did by assuring his timid servant at Dothan. Like Elijah, we must remember that, after a significant spiritual victory in our lives, a wicked Jezebel is usually waiting in the wings if we take our eyes off God and focus them on ourselves. Like the example of Elijah, we can lose faith by anxiety and unrelieved stress. Like Elijah and Joseph's brothers, we need to be brought to solitude to set our spiritual house in order, often pointing out the importance of supportive spiritual family. Like Elijah, we must be keenly aware when our nervous energy becomes overtaxed, when we become sensitive to loneliness, and when we look away from God and begin to focus on the around-and-about. God repaired Elijah's nervous system by allowing him to sleep, feeding him with food, providing him with angelic care, allowing him to express his grief, revealing Himself and His ways, telling him good news, and giving Him more to do.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Apr 5, 2014
A Different Kind of Savior

Richard Ritenbaugh shows that, at the time surrounding the birth of Jesus, there existed considerable messianic fervor. Simeon the priest, Anna the prophetess, and many others, including the Samaritans, were looking for the Messiah. Andrew and his brother Peter were looking for the Messiah and were prepared to follow Him instantaneously. There were many prophecies of the Messiah, included the ousting of oppressors, the evil Edomites, and the permanent establishment of David's dynasty and the Kingdom of God forever. Without God's Spirit, people would pick and choose from the prophecies, concentrating on the militant aspects of the Messiah's work, but ignoring the other aspects of the Messiah's work. The Jews were looking for a military leader like Jehu, a furious, hasty, callous, impetuous man with a temper, having as his express purpose, totally eradicating the legacy of Jezebel. Jehu's campaign proved to demonstrate blood-thirstiness and wrath, but he did not heed the law of God. Consequently, peace did not accrue, but he isolated Israel for its ultimate fall, a fall which Israel would not recover from until Calvary

Show more Show less
Bible Study; June 2007
The Miracles of Jesus Christ: Healing a Leper (Part One)

Leprosy is a horrible, disfiguring disease, one that the ancients said could only be cured by an act of God Himself. Martin Collins shows that Jesus' healing of a leper manifested His divine power and mercy.

Show more Show less
Ready Answer; March 2005
Resurrection AD 31

Matthew 27:52 informs us that more than one resurrection occurred during Passover week in AD 31! This article summarizes the types of resurrections that appear in God's Word, and uses this information to provide answers to the many questions that arise about this astounding miracle.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Feb 5, 2005
What the Holy Spirit Does

Richard Ritenbaugh, after reading a testimonial of a Charismatic, describing being "filled with the Holy Ghost," leading to barking, laughter, violent jerking, and inebriated behavior (a kind of "Pentecostalism on steroids"), asks us to ponder what the Holy Spirit will actually motivate a person to do. Scripture reveals that the Spirit constitutes the active, creative power and mind of God, 1) motivating God's people to do His will, 2) giving them discernment and wisdom, 3) endowing them with strength to do God's work, 4) enabling them to see truth clearly, 5) setting individuals apart (for specific purposes) by ordination, 6) providing physical and spiritual power to overcome and resist the Devil, 7) inspiring a person to speak God's words clearly, and 8) inspiring fellowship with God and His people. God's Spirit will never prod us to do anything that is not out of godly love, and because it a spirit of a sound mind, it will never motivate us to do stupid or crazy things.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Nov 8, 2003
Prophets and Prophecy (Part 1)

John Ritenbaugh explores what the Bible teaches on the function of the prophet. Through Biblical contexts, we learn that a prophet is one who speaks for God, expressing His will and purpose in words and signs. The office of a prophet is to forth-tell God's purpose through His Law and tell people God's words. A true prophet, never losing sight of the law of God, deals with local situations, events of the Messiah, events of the future, and events that are dual in application. The prophet, described as coming from outside the system (who brings new truth building it upon the foundation of old truth) is contrasted with the priest who conserves old truth (given to them by a prophet). A prophet goads people to urgently commit themselves to a righteous course of action, forcing them to make clear and often painful choices. Elijah and John the Baptist clearly fulfilled the role of prophet.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Jul 13, 2002
The Two Witnesses (Part 5)

The Bible shows Christ, at the end, measuring the church with a plumbline, testing for uprightness and determining standards of justice and righteousness. The seven eyes seem to refer to the messengers of the seven churches having a worldwide influence. The olive trees in Zechariah 4:11 refer to the Two Witnesses who pour oil (spiritual instruction) into a golden bowl (a receptacle for this teaching), supplying the churches with spiritual nourishment during their period of testimony before the whole world. They will have power to kill those who would harm them, following the pattern of Elijah (2 Kings 1:10), a kind of carte blanche authority to destroy in order to do their work (Revelation 11:5)

Show more Show less
Article; September 1999
Elisha and the Shunammite Woman, Part II: Serving God's Children

Comparing God's true ministers to false ministers—and seeing their fruit—reveals how the church must be revived spiritually. And "sneezing" plays a major role!

Show more Show less
Article; August 1999
Elisha and the Shunammite Woman, Part I: Reviving God's Children

Some Old Testament stories read like parables, and Elisha's miracles in II Kings 4 are good examples of this. Richard Ritenbaugh draws parallels between modern church history and the second of these miracles.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Dec 3, 1994
Image and Likeness of God (Part 4)

Taking issue with those who have embraced the widely held notion that God does not have body parts, John Ritenbaugh asserts that just because spirit is invisible to the present physical receptors, much the same as wind or electromagnetic waves (John 3:8), it is nevertheless real - able to be comprehended by spiritual receptors (II Kings 6:17, I John 3:2). The numerous figures of speech describing God's body parts substantiate that God has shape and form and occupies a specific location. Figures of speech always have legitimate grounds of comparison. The term omnipresent, rather than suggesting some ethereal grotesque omnibody, can be explained by being "in union with His spirit" as in John 14:19-20 in which God the Father, Christ, and the Called out ones are depicted to be "in" one another- one unit as analogous to a marriage union when two become one flesh through sharing combined goals, aspirations and a kindred spiritual presence.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Dec 18, 1993
Four Views of Christ (Part 5)

John Ritenbaugh focuses on Luke's message of Christ the man, the son of man, the high priest of man, and the savior of man, having all the feelings, fears, anxieties, compassions, and aspirations of man. In this account, Luke emphasizes the universality of the message (Gentiles as well as Jews), emphasizing the common concerns of humanity, highlighting many lowly circumstances. Luke, demonstrating Jesus' humanity emphasizes His frequency in prayer, reflecting His total dependency upon God the Father. Jesus, as the pattern man, learned by obedience, by the things He suffered, qualifying as our high Priest and savior, providing a model of perfect man for us to emulate.

Show more Show less
Sermon; Sep 26, 1992
Satan (Part 3)

John Ritenbaugh reveals that the spirit in man God has given us is initially good, but capable of being molded, influenced by the spirit of this world, and surcharged with Satan's negative attitudes. Consequently, God makes available His Holy Spirit to discern those things we cannot detect by our five senses. Angels are continually working within our environment, stirring up the human spirit, and making sure God's purposes are being established. By God's Spirit, we can detect the subtle influences of Satan, who concentrates on the lusts of our flesh, broadcasting self-indulgent impulses to those who are tuned in. The only way to block this signal is to tune him out (Galatians 5:19-21), discerning the bitter, sullen fruits of his thinking.

Show more Show less
Sermon/Bible Study; Jun 24, 1989
The Commandments (Part 10)

John Ritenbaugh observes that the fifth commandment provides a bridge, connecting our relationships with God and the relationships with our fellow human beings. It is the pre-eminent commandment of the second set of commandments- serving as a twin center pillar with the Sabbath commandment. The honor and deferential respect accorded to Almighty God should transfer to our physical parents and ultimately to other authority figures in society. Because the family structure provides the basic building block or template for all government, including the Government of God, if the family is undermined, society and government is likewise undermined. Because parents stand in the place of God, parents (because they are the formulators of the child's character) must live a life worthy of reverence as well as taking a timely, active, " hands —on" approach to the child's education and upbringing. God demands that parents produce Godly seed.

Show more Show less
Sermon/Bible Study; Dec 9, 1981
Matthew (Part 11)

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on Matthew 7:13-14, observes that life consists of a series of choices—often a dilemma of a pleasurable choice on one hand, and a daunting difficult choice on the other. It seems as though God Almighty and Jesus Christ invariably want us to make the more difficult choice, insuring seemingly the maximum spiritual growth and character development. Moses took the difficult way, forsaking the adulation of leadership in Egypt, becoming the leader of a rag-tag group of disgruntled slaves. Our daily choices (small and large) are based upon the same principle. Sometimes our choices are quite costly, putting our careers and opportunities on the line in order to follow God. Some of the choices we make consist of discerning true ministers from false ministers and discerning the fruits of false religion. We need to develop and maintain an intense love for the truth, by faith developing vision and foresight of future consequences. [NB: This series of Bible Studies from 1981-82 is incomplete.]

Show more Show less
Herbert W. Armstrong booklet; 1973
Where Are Enoch and Elijah?

Enoch was translated that he should not see death. Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven. Yet the Bible reveals they are not in heaven today! Here's the astounding truth.


Looking for scriptures? Go to Bible verses for: Elisha



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

Looking for More?

Receive Biblical truth in your inbox—spam-free! This daily newsletter provides a starting point for personal study, and gives valuable insight into the verses that make up the Word of God. See what over 145,000 subscribers are already receiving.


 





 

Privacy Policy
Close
E-mail This Page