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John the Baptist as Messenger

Go to Bible verses for: John the Baptist as Messenger

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Sermon; Feb 20, 2016
Malachi's Appeal to Backsliders (Part Three)

Martin Collins, returning to the annoying questions asked by the priests in the book of Malachi as to God's alleged tardiness of justice, declares that their call for justice was unwise, considering that they would be fried to a crisp when they received what they deserved. The same applies to us: we need to be careful when we ask for justice, for our request might very well come back to bite us.. Those relentlessly begging for justice will indeed get what they ask for. Their presumptuous questions are all answered by Malachi, indicting both ancient and modern Judah and Israel. God's coming in judgment will be against those who are critical of His judgments. God, like a refiner of precious metals, will skim off the dross until He can see His face. Before the day of vengeance, a lengthy time of grace will precede, including 400 years from the time of Malachi to Christ's reading from Isaiah about bringing liberty and sight to the blind. Another 2,000 years have been added, and the same national sins, such as defiling God's Sabbath and robbing His tithes and offerings (both given before the Mosaic law), still dog our society today. Even though it is axiomatic, according to surveys conducted by Christianity Today and the Barna Group, that individuals who give 10% or more are generally better off than those who do not, the majority of modern Israel have cursed themselves by withholding tithes and offering, mirroring the days of Malachi and Haggai. All we have belongs to God, yet paradoxically if we give back 10%, we are incredibly blessed. Tithing provides for preaching the Gospel, Feast expenses, and helping the needy. Robbing God of His tithes brings curses on the created order, interpersonal relationships, and the covenental relationship. In the matter of tithing, God (1) calls for obedience to bring all the tithes into the storehouse, (2) issues a challenge to test Him, (3) accompanies His challenge with bountiful promises, and (4) reminds us of the ultimate blessing of being an example to the world.

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Sermon; Sep 30, 2008
Lift Up Your Voice Like a Trumpet

Richard Ritenbaugh, suggesting that nothing is more dramatic than the blast of a trumpet, notes that alarm or warning is a primary function of a horn. Israel, spread out over a huge area, used a complex system of trumpet blasts to convey lifesaving information. Silver trumpets were used to call assembly, to direct movement, to call to war, to signal days of gladness, Holy days, new moons, sacrifices and offerings, announcing Jubilee, worship, and the coronation of a king. One of the reasons for the blowing of trumpets is a memorial of a past significant event, Yom Teruah, depicting the covenant relationship with God, a time to glorify and praise God. The second reason was to give direction, to advance into battle, or to take refuge. The third reason to blow the trumpet was to make an announcement, announcing a significant event like the Jubilee or the first and second coming of Israel's king and Messiah. A fourth use of the trumpet blast is to provide warning, motivating us to repent and to protect us from cataclysmic upheaval and the dreadful Day of the Lord and God's wrath, a time no one can endure without God's supernatural protection.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; January 2004
Elijah and John the Baptist

Despite the greatness of the Old Testament prophets, Jesus declares that none was greater than His cousin, John, known as "the Baptist." John Ritenbaugh explains that Jesus clearly says that John fulfilled Malachi 4:5-6 as the prophesied Elijah to come.

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Sermon; Nov 22, 2003
Prophets and Prophecy (Part 2)

John Ritenbaugh reiterates the characteristics of a prophet, showing that both Moses and Aaron fulfilled this role. Jesus described John the Baptist as the greatest of all the Old Covenant prophets, distinctive by his austere dress and diet. Highly esteemed by the common people, John was unusually vital and strong, and consciously prepared the way for the Messiah. Although by no means a wild man, John, like the prophets of old, experienced alienation from people, especially the entrenched religious and political leaders within the system. His greatness lay in 1) the office he filled, 2) the subject he proclaimed, 3) the manner in which he did it, and receding into the background, 4) the zeal in which he performed his office, 5) the courage he demonstrated, 6) his lifetime service, and 7) the number and greatness of his sacrifices, performed in the spirit and power of Elijah, by which he restored and repaired family values, enabling people to see God.

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Bible Study; December 1995
Basic Doctrines: Salvation

Are you saved already or are you being saved? What is salvation anyway? What part do we play in our own salvation? These are important questions that we must answer from God's Word.

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Article; November 1993
New Name - Same Teaching!

In October 1993, the church's magazine took the name Forerunner. This article by managing editor Richard Ritenbaugh explains how this name fits the work of the Church of the Great God.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Jan 20, 1982
Matthew (Part 16)

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that disciples of Christ should expect persecution, often from people we normally would feel comfort and protection from, such as members from our own family. The two-edged sword (the Word of God) divides families because receptivity of this word is not a given- especially if one has not yet been called. Many more people ridicule God's Word than keep it. God's called out ones have to love God's Word more than family. Service in the work of God will inevitably bring persecution, but it will also bring reward. Chapter 11 focuses upon the ruminations of John the Baptist, who even though he was close to Christ, may have misunderstood the nature of Christ's true mission. John the Baptist, labeled as "none greater" never performed a miracle. It will take a great deal of expended energy to make it into the Kingdom of God. We cannot afford to be negligent or complacent about our calling, or our willingness to yield to His teachings, letting it dissipate like the ancient Israelites, the people of Bethsaida or Chorazin - or the Laodiceans . We must be teachable and adaptable, willing to take Christ's yoke, not tripped up in intellectual vanity or pride. [NB: This series of Bible Studies from 1981-82 is incomplete.]

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Sermon/Bible Study; Jul 22, 1981
Matthew (Part 2)


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