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Bible as God's Inspired Revelation

Go to Bible verses for: Bible as God's Inspired Revelation

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CGG Weekly; Jan 12, 2018
Appearing Before God (Part One)

David C. Grabbe:  In Psalm 92:4-5, the psalmist proclaims: For You, LORD, have made me glad through Your work; I will triumph in the works of Your hands. O LORD, how great are Your works! ...

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Sermon; May 20, 2017
The Post-Resurrection Last Words of Christ (Part Three)

Martin Collins, reviewing the significance of Christ's final post-Resurrection sayings, "Feed My sheep" (appearing thrice) and "Follow me" (appearing twice), emphasizes that these words apply to all of God's called-out ones). We have a mandate to study the Bible comprehensively and responsibly, not becoming self-proclaimed 'experts' in prophecy or esoteric mysteries. When we pray and study, we should be conscious we are meeting with God, allowing us to be sensitive to God's purpose for our lives. Like the apostle Peter, we are admonished not to compare our spiritual lot with that of our brethren, riveting our attention on Christ rather than on ourselves or on our spiritual siblings. God has called individuals with different temperaments (impetuous activists, contemplative thinkers, etc.), giving them a variety of spiritual gifts to work interdependently. If we take our eyes off Christ, we run the risk of bumping into someone else and becoming unprofitable. Following Christ involves self-denial and taking responsibility for what God has crafted in us through the power of Christ living in us through His Holy Spirit. John's Gospel provides a comprehensive witness from Christ's contemporaries. As the recipients of this reliable testimony, we are obligated to add our testimony, feeding God's sheep and following Jesus Christ.

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Sermon; Feb 18, 2017
Is God's Inspiration of the Bible Imperfect?

Martin Collins, reflecting on anti-biblical "scholarship" emanating from pseudo-experts, assures us that, when properly evaluated, there are no discrepancies in scripture; God is not the author of confusion, but of peace and order. God purposely refrained from unfolding His Holy Word as a factual historical report in order that we may learn to place "precept with precept," discovering something new every time we read the Bible. The Atheist may feel a certain degree of smugness in denying the Bible. Those of us called of God learn to progress from milk to solid food, stimulating our curiosity in progressive stages, as God brings us to new levels of understanding. God does not enlighten us until we are mature enough to absorb and use knowledge. God may use paradoxes and apparent contradictions to put balance into our behavior, for example, understanding the contexts in which riches or poverty can be either a blessing or a curse. God's Word forces us to value the Spirit above the Letter, walking as a living epistle, rejecting the counterfeit main-stream Christianity's notion that grace gives license to disobey the Law, as we come to recognize that the doers of the law will be justified. Faith without works is dead, but living faith is demonstrated by godly works. The testimony of the Bible and that of the physical universe are not discordant, but harmonious, demonstrating that God is the designer and sustainer of all life. Those who have given their lives to discredit the Bible must shamefully eat their own words in the fullness of time. Bible difficulties are designed to stimulate our minds and make us curious, to lead us to value Spirit over letter and to sharpen our abilities solve paradox and so-called contradiction. God's inspiration of His Word is perfect.

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Bible Study; November 2016
Does the Bible Contain Discrepancies?

Christians believe that the Bible is the written Word of God, and therefore, it is inspired and essentially free from error (any errors being the result of human misunderstanding and misinterpretation). Asking if the Bible can in any way contain contradictions, Martin Collins answers that, while difficulties do exist, they can be explained with thoughtful analysis.

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Sermon; May 24, 2015
Faithful, Following Firstfruits

Richard Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the apostasy and diaspora of our previous fellowship in the 1990s, observes that those reveling in the new 'freedoms' cannot be persuaded to return to former beliefs because they no longer believe in the sanctified Word of God. Instead, many seek scholarly 'higher' criticism of the Scriptures to provide license to various varieties of sin. Like Thomas Jefferson's redaction of Scripture, modern biblical scholars, much further away (in time and understanding) from the original intent of the Scripture than contemporaries of the apostles, presumptuously pontificate, without accurate knowledge, on the intent of the Scriptures. Consequently, 'biblical' scholars, steeped in post-modernist deconstructionism, pick and choose what they pompously believe to be significant. Today, the main representatives of nominal Christianity (Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Protestant) may believe God exists and may believe in various aspects of His character, such as omnipotence, omniscience, omnipotence, love, and grace; nevertheless, they do not want to do what He says, discarding the Old Testament (and much of the New Testament) and that 'horrible' Jewish Sabbath as well as God's commanded Holy Days. Unlike the majority of nominal Christians who believe in God, the First-fruits (a select group of individuals called and set-part by God), as depicted by the Holy Day of Pentecost, faithfully follow Christ's example, allowing God to knead, pound, shape, and bake them in the intense heat of trials, making them acceptable to God, with the goal of becoming the 144,000, redeemed from the earth who will follow Christ as His collective Bride. As we grow toward that goal, we are commanded by Almighty God to live a life of obedience to His Commandments, walking as Christ walked, practicing righteousness until we get it right, and knowing that faith without works is stone dead.

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Commentary; Feb 28, 2015
Conspiracy Theory (Part Twelve)

John Ritenbaugh, observing that God has planned the end time for thousands of years, giving us a tiny preview of what the world would be like in Matthew 24, reminds us that Satan, while limited by God, has done the same thing, orchestrating his plans for hundreds of years, employing not only his demonic forces, but gullible human beings who may not know that they are being used in his service. Technology exploded from the time of Gutenberg's press, unleashing the forces of the Protestant Reformation (which served eventually as a catalyst for the dispersal of multitudes of folk around the world) as well as the current advances in the Internet which enables, paradoxically, both God's work and Satan's education (misinformation and lies) to increase at meteoric proportions. Even though Satan has within his power the ability (and the desire) to destroy the entirety of mankind, God is sovereign over all and He has limited what Satan can do and has placed a protective hedge around His people. He has given them a priceless education through translations of the Bible—a priceless education that billions of people have been denied. It behooves us, as God's called-out ones, to resist the insidious mis-education and dis-information promulgated by Satan, and make use of the priceless knowledge God has given us through His Scriptures.

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CGG Weekly; May 30, 2014
The Bible's Claims About Itself

Richard T. Ritenbaugh:  It is almost impossible for a Christian to have a meeting of minds with an atheist on any subject anywhere in the neighborhood of religion. ...

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CGG Weekly; Mar 13, 2009
The Necessity of Biblical Infallibility

The authority of the Bible has been under constant assault from biblical "scholars" and theologians. ...

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Article; December 2006
Whatever Happened to Gnosticism? Part Two: Defining Gnosticism

For many of us, Gnosticism is difficult to pin down, and this is because it is not itself a religion but a philosophy that piggy-backs on religions. David Grabbe explains how we can see this in Paul's epistles to the Galatians and Colossians, in which he combats Gnosticism's twisting of the truth of Jesus Christ.

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CGG Weekly; May 26, 2006
Dan Brown's Thirty Pieces of Silver

By now, everyone in the Western world has heard of Jesus Christ's betrayal in exchange for some coinage. ...

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; March 2006
Is the Christian Required to Do Works? (Part One)

Why do so many nominal Christians reject works and obedience to God's law? John Ritenbaugh posits that they do this because they fail to gather God's whole counsel on this subject. In doing so, they miss vital principles that help to bring us into the image of God.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; February 2003
The Offerings of Leviticus (Part One): Introduction

The Bible is full of symbols and types. The offerings of Leviticus, though they are no longer necessary under the New Covenant, are wonderful for teaching us about Christ in His roles as sacrifice, offerer, and priest. And they even instruct us in our roles before God too!

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Ready Answer; July 1998
The Oracles of God

Just what are the oracles of God mentioned in Romans 3:2? Charles Whitaker delves into both Testaments to show that they are the revelation of God to mankind. These oracles are the message that gives us instruction for salvation.

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Sep 27, 1996
The Handwriting Is on the Wall (1996)

In this keynote message of the 1996 Feast of Tabernacles, John Ritenbaugh focuses upon the causes of the atomizing of the greater church of God into very small particles. Almighty God, as a means of mercifully disciplining and chastening His faithless children, initiated the scattering of the church (the Israel of God) for our ultimate good (Deuteronomy 28:25; Romans 8:28; Hebrews 12:5-6). Christianity is a religion of revelation- not human intellect. When the revelation of God was replaced with the wisdom of this world (the leaven of errant intellectualism), God had no choice but to scatter. As Israel did not repent at the preaching of Amos, or Judah at the preaching of Jeremiah, the members of the greater church of God did not take the warnings of Herbert Armstrong personally and individually. Any regrouping of the scattered pieces will be done only on God's terms.

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Sermon; Nov 20, 1993
Four Views of Christ (Part 1)

John Ritenbaugh warns us that the Bible paradoxically is both simple and profound, understandable only to those who have been called, love the truth, and are given to careful scrutiny, enabling the searcher to describe every nuance of what it is they desire. The obsessiveness of both a lover and a sports-trivia enthusiast characterize the level of effort involved. The life sustaining manna of the Bible, while abundant and plentiful, is hidden'layered in types, symbols, and allegories. In the typology of the four Edenic rivers flowing from one source (Genesis 2:10) and the four living creatures (Revelation 4:6-8: lion, calf, man, and eagle) lies the foundation for understanding the gospels as four distinct representations of the same Life.

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Sermon; Jul 10, 1993
Revelation 2-3 and Works

John Ritenbaugh stresses that we must avoid distractions and keep our lives focused on God and His Holy Word. The prophetic messages in Revelation 2 and 3 are designed for the end times, shortly before the Tribulation and the Day of the Lord. All seven churches—with their unique attitudes—will be extant contemporaneously at the end time. If a message ("he who overcomes," "I know your works") is repeated seven times in two chapters, God must want us to understand these concerns. Nothing is more important than repentance and overcoming, producing mature, committed, loyal disciples displaying exemplary conduct and good works, avoiding the distractions of Satan (Ephesians 6:12) and the allurements of this world (I John 2:15).

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Herbert W. Armstrong booklet; 1985
The Bible—Superstition or Authority?

Why is the world's best selling book held in awe by some, in passive discredit by others, and understood by virtually none? Why do the many churches of traditional Christianity disagree about what the Bible says? Have you ever PROVED whether, as the book itself purports, it is the authoritative Word of the Creator God?

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Herbert W. Armstrong booklet; 1958
The Proof of the Bible

The BIBLE—Superstition or AUTHORITY? Did you ever stop to PROVE whether the Bible is the divinely inspired Word of God?


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