Sabbath
Sabbath

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Calendar, Hebrew

Go to Bible verses for: Calendar, Hebrew

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CGG Weekly; Jan 1, 2016
The Biblical New Year

Richard T. Ritenbaugh:  When studying a biblical topic, it is always helpful to begin with a plain, unambiguous statement that provides a fundamental understanding of the subject. ...

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Oct 2, 2015
Entrusted with Godly Holiness

Mark Schindler, recaptures the drama of the Continental Congress, occurring after the Revolutionary War, a time of runaway inflation, when colonies treated each other more as enemy countries rather than united commonwealths, when George Washington expressed despair that everything the colonies had fought for seemed to have been in vain. The despair and gloom suddenly dissipated when Benjamin Franklin urged his colleagues to actively seek dependence on Divine Providence. Following this affirmation of following Divine Providence, 28 Principles of Liberties based upon the acknowledgement of Divine Providence were drafted, making the new American experiment in governing the envy of the Western world, bringing peace and tranquility to the United States. We as God's called-out ones have the responsibility to become positive examples to the rest of the world by growing in holiness, separating ourselves from impurity, becoming a holy people. Holiness moves beyond the scope of godliness (a reverential attitude), demanding that one applies energy to living as God lives, seeking a meaningful relationship with God and conforming to His expectations. Living as God commands us to live will bring the wrath of the world on us, but what the whole world is groaning and yearning for we have the privilege of practicing right now. We must be guarding the trust of holiness God has given us, realizing that judgment is on the Israel of God right now. Treating our responsibility lightly or with contempt risks committing the unpardonable sin. Abraham Lincoln said America will never fall to an outside enemy, but will perish from within as we suffer moral rot. The same is true for God's called-out ones; the only one who can violate the trust demanded by our Covenant with God is we ourselves. We have the sobering responsibility of guarding the trust of holiness God has placed in us.

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Ready Answer; November 2014
The Lunar Sabbath or the Seventh-Day Sabbath: Which?

A recent phenomenon among some Sabbatarians is something called the "Lunar Sabbath," counting the weekly Sabbath from each month's new moon. Charles Whitaker argues that the Lunar Sabbath idea is unbiblical and unworkable, asserting that the traditional weekly Sabbath, observed every seventh day, is correct and in line with God's Word.

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Sermonette; Sep 27, 2014
The Year of Release

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on the Year of Release which falls on the Feast of Trumpets, relates that the Year of Release has ushered in major historical events, such as the September 11th attack and two financial collapses in 2001 and 2008. The Year of Release reminds us that God gives land as a gift to mankind to produce wealth. God is the Owner; we are the tenant as long as we exercise responsibility to dress and keep it. The Year of Release cancels, drops, and remits debts. The land continues to be God's. This year reminds us that God is the Creator, and we must trust God for sustenance every day. Man does not hold land in perpetuity, but only under the Eternal's trust. We own nothing until God entrusts us with His spiritual gifts. The Year of Release is a time lenders should forgive debts, mirroring God's forgiving our sins. The ancient Israelites had a difficult time forgiving debt. When we left spiritual Egypt, we were on death row, but all our sins were forgiven and the penalty dropped. The land Sabbath is a type of the weekly Sabbath wherein the land is given time to regenerate and restore its fertility. There was to be no sowing, no reaping, no pruning, and no storing, but the farmer, the animal, and the poor could glean the produce. The seventh year was also the time to release those who had fallen into servitude for monetary ineptitude.

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Sep 30, 2010
John 7:37 Examined (Part 2)

John Ritenbaugh, reminding us that the scene does not change between John 7 and 8, but the location changes in chapter 9, a location where He heals a man who had been blind from his birth. This stirred up another controversy with the Pharisees. All of the events occurring in John 8-10 occurred on the Last Great Day, six months before Jesus was crucified, in the same year on the Hebrew calendar, but on two separate years on the Roman calendar (30 AD and 31 AD). Jesus Christ healed the blind man on a double Sabbath, a high day, and a weekly Sabbath. This verse proves that the seventh day of Feast of Tabernacles is not the eighth day of the Feast of Tabernacles, and that Christ was crucified in 31 AD, and that the postponement rules of the Hebrew calendar are accurate. In October 30 AD, the Feast of Trumpets and the beginning of the Feast of Tabernacles both took place on the Sabbath, while the Last Great Day occurred on the Sabbath. In the spring, calculated with postponements, the crucifixion occurred on a Wednesday while the Resurrection occurred on a Sabbath. According to the scripture, the calendar has to match both years. The only calendar which will fit is the calculated Hebrew calendar using the postponements. The events of John 7:37 categorically prove the veracity of the Hebrew calendar with its postponements. In John 8, Jesus shows us the mindset of the people coming out of the grave. The blind man healed in chapter 9 represents the whole world, spiritually blind from birth. Chapter 10 indicates that there will be no shepherd except for Him. When the resurrection of the rest of the dead occurs, judgment will be rendered on the basis of a person's works. They will be resurrected, either to eternal life or oblivion. This will be a permanent change.

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Sep 30, 2010
John 7:37 Examined (Part 1)

John Ritenbaugh, suggesting that all of us in the church of God had a misconception about this day, focuses upon an understanding of the Last Great Day. The New Testament is needed to put the true stamp of authority to the Holy Days of the Old Testament. In John 7:37, this address was given on the last day of the feast, the day before the Last Great Day. Jesus Christ was crucified on a Wednesday on the Passover, the 14th of Abib, in the afternoon in 31AD (before an annual high holy day) and was resurrected on a Sabbath. We calculate this event using the Hebrew calendar, using the customary postponements. All days, from Passover to Tabernacles, are named in the Bible, except for the Last Great Day, having received its name from the Radio Church of God. From John 7-9, we learn that the Jews invariably misunderstood Jesus Christ's doctrines, having been muddled by their worldly traditions. The Feast of Tabernacles represents a time when God's government will extend over the entire earth. The seventh day of the Feast of Tabernacles is indeed a great day. The Feast of Tabernacles is only seven days long. The eighth day was a separate festival, apart from the Feast of Tabernacles, which can only derive its significance in the New Testament, namely the Day of Judgment, the Great White Throne Judgment, the second resurrection, a time Christ will judge.

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Feast of Tabernacles Sermon; Oct 19, 2000
A Calendar Summary

John Ritenbaugh, cautioning against the danger of presumption, warns against assigning biblical types (like Joshua and Zerubbabel) to any contemporary ministers, pointing out that, except for a few superficial similarities, there are not enough parallels or grounds of comparison to make such an inferential leap. Two major assumptions made by calendar changers are that: (1) the calendar is too complicated and (2) the Jews are guilty of deliberate manipulation in order to create a calendar that is more convenient in actual usage. The Bible nowhere says that the calendar should be simple; everything God has created, including life Bible, the calendar, as well as life itself, is complex. God, totally faithful and reliable, gave us a calendar, assigning the responsibility for its maintenance to the nation of Israel, not to the church or private individuals, guaranteeing order, stability, and unity within the culture. The Anti-Christ inspires tampering with times.

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Sermon; Apr 8, 2000
What Does God Really Want? (Part 1)

John Ritenbaugh focuses upon the atmosphere of disorder which has emerged in the greater church of God, caused by individuals (ministry and lay members alike), obsessed with the urge to change doctrine, convinced that God was too weak to control Herbert W. Armstrong. The unspoken accusation is that God raised up a messenger, sent him with His gospel, and then allowed us to use a faulty calendar. Because no proponents of the calendar change are in agreement, any calendar change will produce more confusion. The priorities in Matthew 6:33 (The Kingdom and His righteousness) indicates that the primary emphasis should be on repentance and overcoming rather than mastering some inconsequential technicality.

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Sermon; Mar 11, 2000
Faith and the Calendar (Part 5): Summary

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that if God had accepted the calendar for 1600 years, it would be presumptuous for one living at the end of days to call it flawed. This calendar issue had surfaced during the tenure of Herbert W. Armstrong's apostleship and was thoroughly studied and systematically resolved. God assigned the tribe of Judah to be the caretakers of the calendar (as part of the oracles; Romans 3:2) The real issue in this controversy is faith in God's sovereignty and His faithfulness. The church does not exist in a vacuum, but as a subset of, subject to the ordinances of the Commonwealth of Israel (and Judah), with whom the Covenants were made. The need for precision, consistency and predictability censures any misguided attempts at establishing home made calendars.

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Sermon; Feb 12, 2000
Faith, Government, and the Calendar (Part 4)

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that the calculated Hebrew calendar reflects God's faithfulness in providing His Spiritual offspring a reliable calendar. To concoct one's own calendar with errant human reason and assumptions equates with the presumptuous way of Cain. Some of the bedrock American values such as competition and individualism, when applied to changing established doctrine and established ordinances, bring an automatic curse of scattering and a seared conscience upon those who do these things. We cannot take the community's laws into our own hands, tweaking them for our own advantage, and still be a good Christian. Challenging the calendar is tantamount to challenging the laws of the Commonwealth of Israel (including its calendar) and challenging the sovereignty of Almighty God.

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Sermon; Feb 5, 2000
Faith, Hope, and the Worship of God (Part 3)

John Ritenbaugh, focusing on the processes of developing faith and hope, indicates that the rules for making the calendar, a very complex activity, are not contained in the Bible. To put ones efforts into such a project (especially with limited or elementary knowledge of astronomy or mathematics) constitutes foolish, misguided zeal. Using errant human assumption, some in the greater church of God have concocted no less than nine conflicting calendars. The preservation of the oracles (including the keeping of the calendar) has not been entrusted to the church but to the tribe of Judah (Romans 3:2). Some of the anti-Jewish bias in the would-be calendar makers smacks of anti-Semitism. We need to have faith in God's ability to preserve a working calendar, believing Him unconditionally as Abraham did.

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Sermon; Jan 8, 2000
Faith and the Calendar (Part 2)

John Ritenbaugh reiterates that the real issue in the calendar controversy is not mathematical or astronomical computations, but faith in God's sovereignty, His providence, His right to assign responsibility, and His capability of maintaining an oversight over this responsibility. God has been faithful in providing a reliable calendar for over 1600 years. God remains consistent with His purpose, maintaining oversight and control. Like our ancient forbears, we dare not stray from things given or entrusted to us. We must hold fast, guarding the truth, honoring our father in the faith, refusing to forage after pernicious false doctrine. The preservation of the calendar was entrusted to the Jews, and specifically the Levites. No church group or private individual should presumptuously arrogate this responsibility to himself or herself.

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Sermon; Jan 1, 2000
Faith and the Calendar (Part 1)

John Ritenbaugh takes issue with those who feel that the perennial calendar controversy was never understood, investigated or resolved by Herbert Armstrong. After a lengthy study in the 1940s, he concluded: (1) there are not enough rules in the Bible to establish a calendar. (2) God had given no authority to anyone outside the Bible to establish a calendar. (3) The oracles of God had been committed to the Jews (Romans 3:1-2), and nobody else. The issue is not mathematical or astronomical, but instead a matter of trust in God's faithfulness, authority, sovereignty, oversight, or ability to govern. If we did not have revelation (including the provision of a calendar) from God, presumptuously trying to establish a calendar independently has led to, and will continue to lead to chaos and confusion.

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Article; August 1994
The Cancerous Calendar Controversy

An exhaustive explanation of the Church of the Great God's belief concerning the Hebrew Calendar and its fitness for our use in the church of God. It also discusses observation versus calculation, new moons and postponements.

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'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh; January 1994
The New Moons

A concise explanation of what the Bible says about New Moons and what that means to us today. This article gives the CGG position on the observance of New Moons.

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Herbert W. Armstrong booklet; 1974
How Often Should We Partake of the Lord's Supper?

The biblical proof that God's people should keep the Passover (the Lord's Supper), explaining that it occurs annually on the evening of Nisan 14.


Looking for scriptures? Go to Bible verses for: Calendar, Hebrew



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