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Casualness


Knowing God: Formality and Customs (Part 3)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh insists that a Christian's perspective or point of reference should always be from God's point of view, as determined by the pages of the Bible. Our human heart, looking and evaluating on the outward appearance, perpetually drawn to the wor. . .

Knowing God: Formality and Customs (Part 2)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh admonishes that we must continually upgrade our decorum and formality in our approach to God, striving to emulate Him in all that we do. Our culture (paralleling the second law of thermo-dynamics) has seriously degenerated in decorum and st. . .

Knowing God: Formality and Customs (Part 4)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, focusing upon the redemptive process, indicates that redemption obligates us to glorify God in our bodies and our spirit. Spiritually, we are literally owned by Christ and are duty bound to do what He asks. Hair length and clothing are out. . .

The Faith Once Delivered

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by Kim Myers

Jude 3-4 cautions us to contend for the faith once delivered to the saints. There are many who would attempt to turn the grace of God into lasciviousness.

What's Happening to Deference?

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, continuing the description of the pernicious fruit of secular humanism, pointing out the one-way nature of tolerance, such as respecting the perverse life-style of homosexuals and other aberrant behaviors and disrespecting the rights of th. . .

The Fear of God (Part 1)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

We must have established some relationship with God before we can rightly fear Him. A holy fear is the key to unlocking the treasuries of salvation and wisdom.

Carelessness

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Carelessness, indicative of not thinking, when reinforced or carried on into life, can be lethal or irreparable. Undervaluing our way leads to a careless lifestyle.

Faith and the Christian Fight (Part 1)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

The Bible abounds in metaphors of warfare, indicating that the Christian's walk will be characterized by stress, sacrifice, and deprivation in building faith.

New Covenant Priesthood (Part 9)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

In this sermon on the deadly consequences of pride, John Ritenbaugh warns that pride elevates one above God, denigrating any dependence upon God, replacing it with insidious self-idolatry. Pride is entirely about disrespect (of God, other people, tradition. . .

Tired Clich├ęs

Commentary by Martin G. Collins

What would happen if God responded to us the same way we funnel our sometimes careless, casual, repetitive, and mindless petitions to Him?

Franchising the Faith

Commentary by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, continuing on the topic of America's woeful lack of knowledge of religion, contends that slick business tactics and advertising takes precedence over scriptural knowledge. Getting a free lunch or a cup of Starbuck's coffee (free bread and . . .

Foundations

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John O. Reid (1930-2016)

John Reid reflects on a prior cruise to the Mediterranean in which he visited the Acropolis, the Parthenon, the Areopagus, Athens, and other locales in which the apostle Paul had walked. The pillars of the Parthenon were fitted together in sections. We, as. . .

The Providence of God (Part 5)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

God uses calamities as part of His creative process. Like Jacob, who initially succumbed to weak faith and fear, we must repent of our loss of devotion to God.



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

Daily Verse and Comment

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