Sixth Commandment
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Paradox

Go to Bible verses for: Paradox

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Twelve): Paradox, Conclusion

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

There is a danger that arises when the righteous suffer and the wicked prosper: trying to put God under obligation to bless us through becoming 'super-righteous'.

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Ten): Paradox

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Ecclesiastes 7 contains a paradox: wickedness appears to be rewarded and righteousness seems to bring trouble. We must be careful in how we respond to this.

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Eleven): Paradox, Continued

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Hard trials are not punishments from God for unrighteousness but tests of faith in which He is intimately involved to prepare us for the world to come.

Eternal Paradoxes

Sermonette by Martin G. Collins

Martin Collins, examining the properties of a paradox (a statement that is seemingly contradictory or opposed to common sense and yet is perhaps true), suggests that paradox plays an essential role in the lives of those called by God. Some of the paradoxic. . .

The Paradox of U.S. Power and Defeat

'World Watch' by David C. Grabbe

Since World War II, the United States has rarely fought a successful military action, be it Korea, Cuba, Vietnam, Iran, or Iraq—yet it stands alone as a superpower on the earth. David Grabbe ponders this geopolitical paradox, one that could greatly a. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Two)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

Trials are a means to produce spiritual growth, unless we resort to super-righteousness, straining to please God by exalting our works.

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-One)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, continuing his exposition on Ecclesiastes, focuses on three interrelated terms: paradox (something contrary to expectation), conundrum (a riddle), and wisdom (skill in arts, such as Bezalel and Oholiab who were gifted in a specific skill&m. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Four)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, continuing his exposition of Ecclesiastes as he focuses on a paradox which initially provides a measure of grief and anguish to believers, the paradox which shows an unrighteous man flourishing and a righteous man suffering, points us to t. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Fourteen): A Summary

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Along with the central paradox of Ecclesiastes 7, the chapter emphasizes the importance of an individual's lifelong search for wisdom.

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Three)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, cuing in on Psalm 73:1-9, describing the despair of someone seeing the wicked prosper while the righteous suffer, affirms that it is a delusion that people in the world are leading comfortable lives. Christian living, while not comfortable. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Fifteen): Deference

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

"Deference" is a word that receives scant support in these days of individual rights and equality. Solomon, however, makes the subject of deference—that is, being properly respectful and submissive to an authority figure—a major part of Ecclesi. . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Five)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the unpleasant prospect of overhearing hurtful gossip about us from someone we have trusted, observes that, in all likelihood, our tongue has been just as detrimental against someone who may have trusted us. What goes around . . .

Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Twenty-Seven)

Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting that Ecclesiastes 7 contains some of the most significant concepts applicable to the Christian religion, identifies them as follows: (1) A good name or reputation (based on trust, responsibility, or dependability) is better than. . .

Ecclesiastes and Christian Living (Part Thirteen): Confessions

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

As he closes Ecclesiastes 7, Solomon makes a confession about the search for wisdom, saying that, even to him, true wisdom remained beyond his grasp.

Psalms: Book Three (Part One)

Sermon by Richard T. Ritenbaugh

Richard Ritenbaugh, aligning Book Three of the Psalms with the hot summer months, the Book of Leviticus in the Torah, the Book of Lamentations in the Megilloth, and Summary Psalm 148, indicates that this portion of Scripture deals with the somber theme of . . .

The Beatitudes, Part 8: Blessed Are the Persecuted

'Personal' from John W. Ritenbaugh

Persecution is a fact of life for a Christian. Jesus Christ says we are blessed if we are persecuted for righteousness' sake — here's why.

Does the Bible Contain Discrepancies?

Bible Study by Martin G. Collins

Christians believe that the Bible is the written Word of God, and therefore, it is inspired and essentially free from error (any errors being the result of human misunderstanding and misinterpretation). Asking if the Bible can in any way contain contradict. . .

To Answer a Fool—or Not

'Ready Answer' by David F. Maas

It can pose quite a quandry: Do we answer a foolish question in an attempt to help, or do we refrain from answering, not wanting to legitimize the fool and his foolishness? David Maas demonstrates that Proverbs 26:4-5 is not a biblical contradiction, provi. . .

Building the Wall (Part 1)

Feast of Tabernacles Sermon by John W. Ritenbaugh

John Ritenbaugh, reflecting on the imagery in Revelation 12:16 of the torrent or flood spewed out from Satan's mouth, depicts the torrent of misinformation and lies, causing anxiety and confusion. Like the scattering of the church, the greater nation of Is. . .


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