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Survival of the Fittest


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CGG Weekly; Jan 5, 2018
The Pursuit of Unity

Levi W. Graham:  New and old, North and South, black and white, Republican and Democrat, left and right. The vast array of differences that make up our world are an ever-present reality. ...

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Commentary; Nov 7, 2015
Mightier Than the Sword (Part Twenty-One)

John Ritenbaugh, observing that the philosophers who have made a lasting negative impact on western culture (Darwin, Marx, Emerson) were born within one decade after the 19th Century began, warns that Satan has been exponentially stepping up his diabolical attack on all of mankind, using the poisonous pens of these philosophers to caustically erode religion, economics, science, and theology. All of these philosophers had been born into religious families; some of which had fathers which were pastors. Another radical philosopher who fits into this mold was Friedrich Nietzsche, who was the both the son of and nephew of Lutheran pastors, but was influenced by Feuerbach's The Essence of Christianity, to totally cut his ties with any form of religion. Nietzsche's ideas were extremely toxic, having powerful influence inside Germany, branding him, in some circles, as the most dangerous philosopher of the Millennium, having unmitigated arrogance and a demonic hatred toward Christ. In 1888, Nietzsche identified himself as the anti-Christ, about a month before he became clinically insane, never to recover his lucidity. Despite his abject insanity, his ideas became instrumental in modern psychology, especially the emerging tributary of existentialism, a philosophical stance regarding experience as unexplainable, ruling out the possibility of any Creator God who is working out any purpose on earth. Nietzsche's "will to power" translates into the authoritarian "might makes right" stance practiced by many individuals, including Hitler, Lenin, Stalin, and Mao Tse Tung, as well as many of those wielding and seeking power today. Nietzsche desired that the strong would overpower and liquidate the weak, claiming that the noblest class were the barbarians—a survival -of -the-fittest scheme that fit into and shaped Darwin's teachings. Nietzsche's ideas also shaped the human potential movement as well as the literary works of George Bernard Shaw, Eugene O'Neill, Ernest Hemmingway, Mark Twain, and F. Scott Fit

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Sermon; Nov 30, 2013
Ecclesiastes Resumed (Part Ten)

John Ritenbaugh, stating that Ecclesiastes 3 expresses awesome possibilities for the future, also points out that Ecclesiastes 4 reminds us that there are harsh realities for those living under the sun, making compromise with the world inviting. Many of God's servants, including Elijah and Jeremiah, had their crises of faith, desiring to flee from their responsibilities and commitments. Living in this world can be discouraging and downright difficult because of the presence of evil, but God urges us to contentment, reminding those called out that He has gifted us to withstand the many tests of our faith. Solomon witnessed the hopeless corruption of the legal system of his time. Freedom only works when its constituents behave morally, but will self-destruct as its constituents behave immorally. Solomon observed that undesirable extremes exist in the work ethic continuum, including excessive competition, greed, laziness, sloth, miserliness, and selfishness. The balanced work ethic combines industriousness with contentment, as well as a willingness to share work and the fruits of work with others. Solomon warns that fame, power, and political success are fleeting and fickle, and the demise is quickened by pride. Each political victory carries the seed of its own destruction, producing a harvest of discontent and resentment. We live our entire lives in a world under the sun, forcing us to trust God in an attitude of faith and contentment for the variety of experiences which shape and develop our emerging Godly character.

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Sermon; Sep 18, 2010
Satan, Division, and Humility

John Ritenbaugh suggests that competition is the root cause of all war, business takeovers, and marital discord. Carl Von Clausewitz observed that war is nothing more than politics brought to the battlefield. Evolution has glorified competition, enshrining the survival of the fittest. Historically, the competitive nature has its roots in the mind of Satan, who had the audacity to take on the leadership of Almighty God. Man's rivalry with one another has been described by Solomon as a striving after wind. Abraham literally "took the high ground," separating himself from strife with his ambitious nephew who wanted to seek gain on the plains of Sodom. The apostle Paul showed willingness to forgo his well-deserved wages, willing to work privately, avoiding conflict and strife. Christianity should be service- oriented rather than profit- oriented, should reward the worker for his labor, and should replace competition with cooperation. Biblical history records the tortured chronicle of people striving against God. The Gentiles cut themselves off from God by rejecting God's teachings through the patriarchs. We must replace the works of the flesh with the fruit of the Spirit, willing to yield and submit rather than to strive, quarrel, and compete. Satan has successfully deceived the entire world by mixing a little truth with much error, appealing to our pride and tissue needs. On the Day of Atonement, we (as God's called-out remnant) are commanded to afflict our souls, putting down the striving competitive, pride-filled drives of human nature, with its intense appetites, mortifying our flesh, controlling ourselves by submitting to God in humility, taking the cue from our Elder Brother.

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Sermon/Bible Study; Jun 27, 1989
Lamentations (Part 7; 1989)

Prior to the study of Lamentations, John Ritenbaugh, focusing upon the meaning of Matthew 24:40-41, contends that the separation that occurs does not apply to a secret rapture but, more probably, to a separation suggested by Revelation 13:10-16, in which a portion of the church is preserved in a place of safety and another portion is designated to endure the persecution of Satan. Lamentations 3 and 4 show the stark contrast of a once proud people (secure in their wealth, technology, and cleverness) suffering bitter persecution and humiliation at the hands of a people considered by them to be their moral inferiors. In the midst of this suffering, in which the ravages of famine have brought about a degradation of compassion and moral sensibility in Israel, the narrator (presumably Jeremiah) stresses that vindication and ultimate restoration will come only from God.



The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment
The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment

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